Q & A: Dallas business owner Candace Green drawing rave reviews with Simplyyy Romantic

EDITOR’S NOTE: When Candace Green graduated from Skyline High in the Dallas area in the late 1990s, among the things she dreamt was embarking upon the entrepreneurial industry. After years of constant research and perseverance, it’s safe to assume that Green undoubtedly has found her niche as a rising entrepreneur. So much, in fact, that Green’s business venture, Simplyyy Romantic, has drawn rave reviews in such a short time span. To Green’s credit, no doubt her latest venture figures to grasp the attention of those who aspire to spice up and enhance their love life, let alone the overall entire landscape of their relationship. During a recent interview with longtime journalist Andre Johnson, Green spoke in detail about her business.

Can2ANDRE: You’re a rather young and vibrant business owner. What is your age?
CANDACE: I am age 32.

ANDRE: Tell our readers what high school you attended.
CANDACE: I went to Skyline High School.

ANDRE: So what is the name of your latest business venture you’d like the general public to embrace?
CANDACE: The name of my business is Simplyyy Romantic.

ANDRE: Clearly, Candace, your Q & A story will be featured on a sports-oriented website. Were you at one point in time involved in athletics?
CANDACE: I didn’t play any sports.

ANDRE: Candace, please enlighten our readers on why Simplyyy Romantic stands out above other business establishments similar to it.
CANDACE: My business helps put the romance back in couples marriage and relationship. People say that my business is different and unique.

ANDRE: Now, of course, many of our readers would like to know when is the best time to take advatage of your business. In other words, when is Simplyyy Romantic’s peak season?
CANDACE: I expect for my business to be it’s busiest on Birthdays, Wedding Days, Valentine’s Day, and various anniversaries.

ANDRE: And, finally Candace, what is amongst the targeted age group for your newly-established busniess venture?
CANDACE: The group that reaches out to me is men and women 27-50.

For more information on Simplyyy Romantic, email Candace Green at: simplyyyromantic@gmail.com.

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

 

Former Memphis Grizzlies guard Wayne Ellington rejoins Lakers after murder of his father

DALLAS — As his eyes began to flood with tears, Wayne Ellington sat in front of his locker in the visiting locker room Friday night in the American Airlines Center and told reporters something his father had inspired him to do ever since he first picked up a basketball as a child growing up in the outskirts of Philadelphia.

Former Memphis Grizzlies shooting guard Wayne Ellington rejoined the Lakers Thursday, less than two weeks after the death of his father November 9 in the Philadelphia. Wayne Ellington, Sr. was found in his car with a gunshot wound to the head by an unknown assailant. (Photo by  Juan O'Campo/NBAE via Getty Images)

Former Memphis Grizzlies shooting guard Wayne Ellington rejoined the Lakers Thursday, less than two weeks after the death of his father November 9 in the Philadelphia. Wayne Ellington, Sr. was found in his car with a gunshot wound to the head by an unknown assailant. (Photos by Juan O’Campo/NBAE via Getty Images)

“I will get through it,” Ellington said. “Obviously, it’s a situation where you’ve got to get through it.”

Ellington was alluding to the death of his 57-year-old father November 9 in the Philadelphia. Ellington’s father — also named Wayne — was found in his car with a gunshot wound to the head by an unknown assailant, news that sent shock waves to Ellington and the Lakers organization moments before the team was about to face the Charlotte Hornets.

Ellington, 27, who signed with the Lakers after training camp in September, was granted an indefinite leave of absence, but rejoined the team Thursday, one day after the Lakers’ win at Houston.

Although Ellington participated in a pregame shootaround, Lakers coach Byron Scott told reporters before Friday’s game against Dallas that Ellington likely would not see action.

“He’s okay,” Scott said of Ellington. “I think he’s trying to get back familiar with us and familiar with his surroundings. I think the more he’s with us, the better he’ll be.”

Ellington was informed of his father’s death following the Lakers’ November 9 win over the Hornets at the Staples Center.

So far, no arrests have been reported.

Ellington He said he plans to dedicate the rest of the season to his father by writing his name on his sneakers.

Ellington He said he plans to dedicate the rest of the season to his father by writing his name on his sneakers.

While addressing the media Friday, a mostly teary-eyed Ellington recalled how instrumental his father had been during his basketball career, most notably during his days at the University of North Carolina and when he entered the NBA ranks after leading the Tar Heels to the national championship in 2009.

“You know, this is what he wanted for me,” Ellington said, when asked what memorable lesson his father taught him. “While at Carolina, you know, he was the guy who was always talking about tradition. He said when you go to Carolina, you look up and see all the banners. He was so ecstatic when I signed here before training camp. He was telling me how proud of me he is. He was saying, ‘You’re back in that same Carolina-type situation.’ He was like, ‘I really feel like this is the spot for you.’”

While several Laker players expressed their disappointment after learning of the death of Ellington’s father, the six-year pro said he was especially pleased with the support shown by Scott, the Lakers first-year coach for whom Ellington played during his brief stint with Cleveland last season.

Drafted 28th overall by the Minnesota Timberwolves in 2009, Ellington also played briefly for Memphis and Dallas.

“Coach Scott has been a great for me,” Ellington said. “He was great for me in Cleveland as well. When I played in Memphis, we had a lot of guys in the rotation. We were deep every night and I wasn’t playing as much. And then when I came to Cleveland and was playing for him, that kind of gave me a boost of energy, that boost of confidence. And that helped me and it was the same thing when I got here. He’s a guy who has tremendous confidence in me and I thrive off that.”

Besides Scott, Ellington said Lakers superstar Kobe Bryant contacted him regularly to show support during his nearly two-week absence from the team. Also, Ellington fielded phone calls from former Grizzly teammates Rudy Gay and Zach Randolph.

“He reached out almost every day,” Ellington said of Bryant. “It was unbelievable as our leader. Obviously, the season didn’t start off the way we liked. But we’re family here and (the Lakers) made me feel like that.”

While Ellington is expected to see action Sunday night when the Lakers host Denver, the Wynnewood, Pennsylvania native said he sensed earlier this week it was time to reunite with his teammates. He said he plans to dedicate the rest of the season to his father by writing his name on his sneakers.

Ellington has appeared in six of the Lakers’ 13 games, averaging 7.8 points and 3.2 rebounds. He scored a season-best 13 points in 25 minutes in an October 9 loss to Phoenix.

“It was just a feeling,” said Ellington, explaining his decision to return to the team. “And in talking to my family, they kind of pushed me as well. They wanted me to get back to doing what I love to do and to take my mind off of it. Being here has been a lot easier for me. So yeah, man, I’m leaving it all out there every single day, every time I step out there on that floor. I’m going to do something special for him.”

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley: ‘Obviously, I want to make my first All-Star appearance’

EDITOR’S NOTE: When Mike Conley, Jr. entered the NBA ranks in 2007, he was widely viewed as an unproven rookie and the son of Olympic gold and silver medalist triple jumper Mike Conley, Sr. Now in his seventh professional season for the Memphis Grizzlies, Conley, the longest-tenured player on the roster, has emerged as arguably the most underappreciated point guard in the NBA. No doubt, the 27-year-old Conley is the catalyst of a Grizzlies team that boasts the league’s best record and is a legitimate contender to represent the Western Conference in the NBA Finals this year. During a recent exclusive interview with MemphiSport NBA Southwest Division reporter Andre Johnson, Conley spoke about the lofty expectations for this year’s team as well as assessed what has been a stellar career for the native of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Here are 11 questions for No. 11.

BOLD CONFESSION --- Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley doesn't shy away from the notion that he's aiming to make his first All-Star appearance in this, his seventh NBA season. Conley is Memphis' second-leading scorer, averaging 16.6 points per game. (Photo by Joe Murphy/NBAE Getty Images

BOLD CONFESSION — Memphis Grizzlies point guard Mike Conley doesn’t shy away from the notion that he’s aiming to make his first All-Star appearance in this, his seventh NBA season. Conley is Memphis’ second-leading scorer, averaging 16.6 points per game. (Photo by Joe Murphy/NBAE Getty Images

ANDRE: A lot has been said about the organization drafting Memphian Jarnell Stokes back in June. What’s so special about his presence on the team?
MIKE: Jarnell’s done a great job for us since Day 1. He has brought energy to our team. You know, he’s a hard-nosed worker and he wants to get better. He has two great big men to learn from in Marc (Gasol) and Zach (Randolph) and even Kosta (Koufos) and Jon (Leuer). You know, those guys have a wealth of experience and can help Jarnell. I think he’s done a great job with the minutes he’s been given. He really hasn’t been able to show much out there as he wants to. But for the most part, in his short time, he’s done a great job, knowing the plays, where to be on the floor, being in the right spots and capitalizing off that.

ANDRE: Zach Randolph decided in the offseason to return to the organization. There were many speculations as to whether he might move on, but he’s back in a Grizzlies uniform. In your estimation, how special is it having Zach back?
MIKE: It is huge. He’s the head of this ship, man. He always will be. He’s made this team what it is today. So without him, we wouldn’t be here. With him, we’re like family, so it’s awesome to have him back.

ANDRE: Did the Grizzlies get better in the offseason?
MIKE: I thought we did get better in the offseason. And not only because of (the acquisition) Vince Carter and the rookies, but a lot of guys have added a little bit more to their game. So we’re looking forward to a lot of guys stepping up and taking on different roles. They’ll have more on their plate, so hopefully that’ll improve our team and give us a chance to make a deep run.

ANDRE: Much had been said about your constant progress last year, particularly before the All-Star break. In fact, there were a lot of national media prognosticators who sensed you should have gotten serious consideration to represent the West in the All-Star Game. But because the West is so deep at that position with the Chris Pauls and Damian Lillards of the world, you weren’t selected. Do you feel at this stage in your career you’re getting the respect you deserve?
MIKE: Um…slowly. You know, it’s a journey, man. It’s been a journey for me just trying to get better every year and getting attention by adding more to my game and proving that I can play. So I think people are starting to understand my style of play and I just want to keep getting better and not worry about whether people will respect me or not. I just want to go out there and play the best basketball I can.

HUGE IMPACT --- A majority of Conley's seven NBA seasons has been spent under the direction Lionel Hollins. Hollins coached the Grizzlies from 2009-2013 before being hired as the Brooklyn Nets' coach in July.

HUGE IMPACT — A majority of Conley’s seven NBA seasons have been spent under the direction Lionel Hollins. Hollins coached the Grizzlies from 2009-2013 before being hired as the Brooklyn Nets’ coach in July.

ANDRE: Obviously, this team would like to finish in the top three or top four in the Western Conference standings heading into the postseason. But what are your personal expectations in this, your seventh NBA season?
MIKE: I want to be a better leader. I want to be a better leader for this team, want to be someone everybody can count on. Obviously, I want to make my first All-Star appearance. You know, everyone wants to be an All-Star. But I’m beyond that. I just want to win. If we win, I think we’ll get the attention we deserve.

ANDRE: Now, of course, (Grizzlies head coach Dave) Joerger is back after much reshuffling in the front office in the offseason. Describe your relationship with your coach.
MIKE: It was good that Dave came back because we didn’t need a new rotation of coaches coming in. We need that stability. He’s been here pretty much my entire career and just to have him here as the head coach two years in a row will be great. After his first season, he’s going to be much better.

ANDRE: Speaking of head coaches, Lionel (former Grizzlies coach Hollins) has resurfaced in the head-coaching ranks in the league. Of course, a lot of people felt he should have landed a head coaching job last year. Lionel was very, very big on you, particularly when people said negative things about your style of play. How happy were you when he resurfaced in the NBA?
MIKE: I was very happy for him. I texted him, called him and congratulated him. It was well-deserved, man. He’s a great coach. I know they (Brooklyn Nets) got a good one and he’s looking forward to that opportunity and he’s going to make the best of it.

ANDRE: In terms of NBA point guards, you’ve made a name for yourself. Clearly, your stock has risen and people are now starting to respect your overall body of work. But who are among of the NBA point guards Mike Conley likes to watch?
MIKE: Who Mike Conley likes to watch? Well, I like to watch the ones on all 32 teams.

ANDRE: Of course, I can’t let you off the hook that easily, Mike. Tell me. Who do you like to watch the most?
MIKE: Well, every team has a great point guard. You have athletic points like Russell Westbrook and Derrick Rose. You have some smaller points…Isaiah Thomas is a good one and plays well. Eric Bledsoe is another good one. So you have a lot of good ones. But I can tell you it’s tough to play against them. It’s not too much to watch them. But I have to deal with them on the court.

ANDRE: Is there any player on the team you hang out with on a regular basis?
MIKE: I pretty much hang out with all of them. We try to do as much together as we can. But Marc is probably the closet one I’m with.

ANDRE: Do you expect to be more vocal this year as the Grizzlies’ floor general?
MIKE: I do. I figured I’ve earned the respect to do that, just coming out and being assertive and more vocal because they believe in me running the show.

ANDRE: Here’s a bonus question, Mike. Of course, you’re an Ohio State man after having played two seasons for the Buckeyes. This is seemingly a down year for Michigan football. But I’ve got to ask you this as these schools prepare to meet in a few weeks. Ohio State or Michigan?
MIKE: Ohio State, man.

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Q & A: Andre Johnson catches up with Geeter Middle football coach Kevin Patterson

Get ready, Memphis.

Get ready, TSSAA.

Get ready, Shelby County high school football fans. Kevin Patterson, the 29-year-old head coach for Geeter Middle School is, according to his peers and veteran head coaches throughout the Mid-South, the best kept secret on the football-coaching sidelines in the Shelby Metro area. To his credit, Patterson took the Geeter program from years of futility to a team that advanced to this year’s City Championship. In fact, that high-octane Dragons made so much noise this year at the middle school ranks is a microcosm of how successful Patterson’s program will be in the coming years. So get ready, Memphis. Patterson undoubtedly will be the next best thing on the high school football ranks in the Mid-South in the coming years. In the wake of his rapid success, Patterson recently spoke with MemphiSport senior writer Andre Johnson on the 2014 season.

GeeterMainANDRE: What is your full name?

KEVIN: Kevin Patterson Jr.

ANDRE: What is your age?

KEVIN: I’m 29 years old.Geeter1

ANDRE: Where are you originally from?

KEVIN: I’m originally from Memphis, Tennessee

ANDRE: Where did you play high school/college football?

KEVIN: I played football at Fairley High School in Memphis Tennessee under Coach Ike White Jr.

ANDRE: Coach, in your own words, how would you access the overall season?

Geeter5KEVIN: The overall season was a phenomenal season. The team believed in the coaches and their teammates.The season had its ups and downs but our true test was during the playoffs. We beat Oakhaven middle the first game 12-8 and the second round playoff game we defeated Sherwood Middle 20-16 in the last 10 seconds of the game to be able to compete for the city championship. There was great support from the parents, teachers, community , administration throughout the whole season. We were victorious on and off the field. This is just a stepping stone to help us to continue building Student Athletes.

ANDRE: When did you go into coaching?
KEVIN: I have been coaching about 6 years now

ANDRE: What do you like most about coaching?

KEVIN: I love that I am able to help inner – city young men develop their gift as a student athlete.

ANDRE: Brief me on your coaching background? Geeter5

KEVIN:In 2009 I started out just watching and learning from Coach Nathan Cole at Mitchell High School. I later left Mitchell and began coaching at Hamilton Middle as the Offensive Cooridnator under Head Coach Ed Slaughter for two years and then under head coach Antonio Avant for one you before leaving to take the head coaching position at Geeter Middle School. I have always had a passion for coaching and every chance I get I try to glean any advice from very prominent head coaches in Memphis such as Rahmann Slocum, Nate Cole, Decorye Hampton, Rodney Saulsberry,Antonio Avant, Wayne Chalmers, Thurston Rubin, Teli White, Carl Coleman, Rodricel “Mudd” Williams and the list goes on. So you can say I love to build relationships.

ANDRE: When did you inherit the Geeter football program?

KEVIN: I inherited the football program at Geeter on July 15, 2013

ANDRE: Describe how the program was when you took over?

KEVIN: Wow!!!!! When I took over the program it was in its low stages. The morale was down and the school hadn’t had a winning season from what I was told in over 10 years. It seemed as if the kids were not interested in football at Geeter because the program had not been winning. So the kids would go to other schools such as Lanier, Havenview, And John P. Freeman. I literally had to drive around the neighborhood looking for the students that went to Geeter and try to see who was interested in the program and that changes were going to be made. In other words I had to sell the product and that was the revitalization of the football program at Geeter Middle School. People still didn’t believe so we had to make a statement quick with only two weeks in between the time I was given the job and the first regular season game. But there was a major stumbling block. When I did inventory of the equipment I couldn’t do anything but shake my head. The school had 30 Schutt helmets that were in good condition but there were no uniforms. There were literally jerseys that had numbers falling off of them, only 13 jerseys, too big jerseys, I must say it was very frustrating and myself and the assistant coach at the time Clarence Marshall had to think quick. There was not money for uniforms because the footnall program had not generated much money. So we solicited donations from churches, faculty, staff, alumni, and community leaders. But one day we got a major blessing. Our principal Lori Oduyoye once taught Thaddeus Young (Minnesota Timberwolves) at Mitchell High School and she gave him a call asking for support. After the conversation, Thaddues out of the kindness of his heart purchased us two sets of jerseys, a set of pants, girdles and other football accessories. It was a huge relief and a new era to the Geeter Middle School Football program. I believe if you look good, you play good.

ANDRE: What changes did you make?

Geeter2KEVIN: I literally had to change the culture of the football program. I had to get a coaching staff to help with the building of the program. I had to teach discipline in which some young men lacked, I had to push the boys to trust in their gift and never give up. I had to change the morale of the football team. Myself along with the coaching staff had to sell ourselves to the team to let them know that they could trust us and that we were dedicated to change the look of the program. Also I had to make sure that they knew that academics is more important than football, and in order to maintain a member of the football team their grades would have to remain in good standings.

ANDRE: How far as the program come under your leadership?

KEVIN: In previous years the team numbers were low and in my first year we had about 27 young men and currently we have 33 young men on roster. My first year we had a 6-2 record and made it to the first round playoffs for the first time in over 10 years. It was a great look for the building of the football program at Geeter. We knew that we had to keep building so we had spring work outs and summer workouts to prepare to be better in the 2014 football season. We set goals in which we are constantly achieving week by week. Currently we are 5-0 with two games left in the season against Munford Middle School, and John P. Freeman Middle School as we prepare for the 2014 playoffs. So it has been a joy to see the rebirth of the football program at Geeter. Notice we don’t call it a football team but we call it a football program because we are preparing our young men for the next level of football.

ANDRE: How beneficial has your coaching staff been?

KEVIN: Oh Wow! My coaching staff I feel is the greatest coaching staff in Middle School football. These guys are literally dedicated to these young men. My coaches have literally been through things in which they are able to relate to these young men and mentor these boys on a daily basis. My coaches are very faithful, I mean they are all volunteer coaches but these coaches are at practice early and don’t mind staying late to perfect whatever we are working on that day. A lot of peple criticize the coaching staff because they feel as if I don’t need to have 7 coaches on a middle school staff. I know I cant do it by myself so I wat to give these young men the adequate help by having coaches who have played the game and know exactly what they are teaching the athletes. I feel we are a close coaching staffs we have meeting, fellowships, and etc as if we were coaching on a high school level and that’s how devoted were are to maintain a top notch football program at Geeter. I want the biys to be the best they can be and I will only give them the best coaches to help them.

ANDRE: Do you boasts aspirations of coaching high school football?

KEVIN: I don’t think it’s a day that goes by that I don’t think about the opportunity to coach on the high school level. If I was able to coach on the high school level, I would accept and take the coaching staff that assist me now with me so that we can help young men on the next level to be better.

ANDRE: Why is the sky’s the limit for you as a coach?

KEVIN: I simply understand and envision football as more than a sport. I see it as a avenue to be a role model and mentor to these iner city athletes. I see that they have so much potential and I feel that I can along with the coaching staff can be the catalyst to help them reach their maximum potential as an athlete. I have watched coach like Nate Cole and Rahman Slocum take young men under their wings and help them become better young men and that is the same desire that I have, to help these athletes become great young men through sports and academics. I am grateful for the administration, faculty, staff and parents of Geeter Middle School for entrusting me with these young men. But lastly the greatest coaching staff a coach can ask for.

Kevin Patterson Jr – Head Coach

Michael Mosby – Assistant Coach/ Quarterback Coach

Ronald Monger – Defensive Coordinator/ Wide Receiver Coach

Montrell Cox – Special Teams Cooridnator

Rodney Harper – Offensive Line Coach

Wayne Chalmers – Defensive Line Coach

Bryant Jones – Defensive Back Coach/ running Back Coach

Clarence Lenton – Defensive Back Coach

Clarence Marshall – Athletic Director

DrePicAndre Johnson, a 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NFL and the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, email him at andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Tulsa true freshman Earl Rollins’ upbringing has given way to success on the field

IRVING, Texas — Earlier this week, Regina Rollins took a moment to assess her son’s well-established upbringing.

TEXAS-SIZE SUPPORT --- For Henry and Regina Rollins, witnessing their son, Tulsa freshman defensive end Earl Rollins, savor his long-awaited dream of playing major college football is testament of the dedication and support they have steadfastly demonstrated since his days of playing in Dallas-area youth leagues. (Photo submitted by Regina Rollins)

TEXAS-SIZE SUPPORT — For Henry and Regina Rollins, witnessing their son, Tulsa freshman defensive end Earl Rollins, savor his long-awaited dream of playing major college football is testament of the dedication and support they have steadfastly demonstrated since his days of playing in Dallas-area youth leagues. (Photo submitted by Regina Rollins)

Given her in-depth relocation, it’s safe to assume she could go all day talking about Earl Rollins, a true freshman defensive end for the University of Tulsa football program.

As Regina Rollins tells it, Earl was brought up in a Christian-oriented environment that was comprised mostly of pastors and ministers. Having been raised in a two-parent home in which family prayer and attending church were customary trends, Regina and her husband, Henry Rollins, proved to be quite instrumental in their son’s continuous success as a football player.

How else to explain why Earl has managed to showcase his immense skills for a major Division 1 college football program?

A former MacArthur High standout, Earl has made his presence felt in this, his first full season of collegiate football for Tulsa (1-6, 1-2), which will be aiming to snap a six-game winless streak when it travels to play Memphis (4-3, 2-1) Friday night at 7 CST in a nationally-televised (ESPNU) American Athletic Conference game.

For Henry and Regina Rollins, witnessing their son savor his long-awaited dream of playing major college football is a testament of the dedication and support they have steadfastly demonstrated since his days of playing in Dallas-area youth leagues.

For starters, Henry Rollins spent years coaching his son during his days of playing competitive ball for the Irving Football Association. And, in Regina’s estimation, she served as the self-proclaimed “team mom” whenever her son suited up for games.

FRESHMAN SENSATION --- A former MacArthur High standout, Earl Rollins has made his presence felt in this, his first full season of collegiate football for Tulsa (1-6, 1-2), which will be aiming to snap a six-game winless streak when it travels to play Memphis (4-3, 2-1) Friday night at 7 CST in a nationally-televised (ESPNU) American Athletic Conference game. (Photo courtesy of University of Tulsa Athletics)

FRESHMAN SENSATION — A former MacArthur High standout, Earl Rollins has made his presence felt in this, his first full season of collegiate football for Tulsa (1-6, 1-2), which will be aiming to snap a six-game winless streak when it travels to play Memphis (4-3, 2-1) Friday night at 7 CST in a nationally-televised (ESPNU) American Athletic Conference game. (Photo courtesy of University of Tulsa Athletics)

“Earl was always off the growth chart as an infant,” Regina told MemphiSport.com. “He was always above average from his peers in school, not to mention when I was carrying him, the hits, turns, flips and kicks gave me a great discernment this is a football player. We knew he had the love for the game in Pee Wee, because he would always say to his dad he’s ready to tackle and why does he have to pull flags.”

Like his parents, there’s no doubt Tulsa coach Bill Blankenship and his staff have embraced how Earl Rollins has gone about finding his niche as a key contributor for the Golden Hurricanes’ defensive unit.

Through seven games, the 6-foot-3, 275-pound Earl Rollins has made two starts, while recording three tackles, two of which were solo tackles.

While Earl isn’t expected to start in Friday’s contest at Memphis, according to a team official, he is expected to see a significant amount of action against the upstart Tigers.

Still, with so much football ahead of him at the collegiate ranks, many would agree the sky’s the limit for a rugged, talented defender who, to his credit, has been nothing less than impressive for a rebuilding Tulsa team.

No one, it seems, knows that more than Henry and Regina Rollins.

“He’s awesome,” Henry Rollins said in assessing his son’s rise a football player. “He was Tulsa’s top recruit at the defensive tackle position. He worked very hard for this position. For him to be in his first year out of high school proves his ability athletic and academic eligibility.”

Said Regina Rollins: “He mentioned in his year book 2014 that he is blessed and not many have had this opportunity. The thing God is showing him through this experience with football and education is the foundation for growing him into a successful young man for whatever his future endeavor.”

A future that, given his rapid progress at the collegiate ranks, could very well land him in the NFL in the coming years.

All because of his well-established upbringing.

DrePicAndre Johnson, a 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NFL and the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, email him at andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

 

Q & A: NBA Reporter Andre Johnson catches up with Jr. Pro Sports director Jason Buford

EDITOR’S NOTE: Memphis loves Jason Buford. And Buford loves Memphis. So much, in fact, that three years ago, Buford founded Jr. Pro Sports, which enabled him to establish a close-knit relationship with the NBA’s Memphis Grizzlies through an organization called Junior Grizzlies. An organization that has flourished immensely throughout the Mid-South since its inception, Buford is devising ways to enhance his product on a national platform. Just recently, Buford spoke with MemphiSport NBA reporter Andre Johnson about his organization. Here’s a Q and A conversation.

JPSANDRE: You seem to really love basketball? Did you play in high school?
JASON: Yes I played basketball in junior high school at Havenview Jr. High School and played in high school at Hardin County High School in Savannah, Tennessee. My dad was a coach of Babe Ruth Dixie youth baseball for 16 years in Savannah, Tn. I’ve been around sports all my life. So, I love basketball but more than that I love being able to teach, mentor, and guide the kids in life lessons through athletics. My passion comes from the affects you have on increasing a child’s self-esteem, building their self-confidence or improving their talents.

ANDRE: What motivated you to start Jr. Pro Sports?
JASON: Jr. Pro Sports was started because my son was having a problem making his middle school team. I knew he was capable of playing because he played AAU against a lot of the best players in the city. I didn’t want my son to lose his passion for the game through the disappointment of rejection. So after creating the tournaments at my church, I decided to create a sports organization for kids like him who has the passion and ability but who are not making the team. It’s thousands of kids just like he was. It’s such a reward now to see kids that start in my organization move on to other organizations and becomes stars or make their middle school, high school, or college.

ANDRE: What is your organization’s mission?
JASON: The mission of Jr. Pro Sports is to create an organization that brings athletic programs to our children that inspires, develops, and encourage our kids in a positive, healthy, and uplifting environment. We aim to bring churches, schools, businesses, and government resources together to give our children more hope about their future. Mission- Jr. Pro Sports takes pride in seeing the vision of our clients’ and partners’ need in sports. Choosing the best direction to fulfill the purpose received with a combination of healthy physically, mentally, and spiritually athletic programs. JPS focus on producing results remarkably beneficial to all participants, partners, and parents.

Services-League, Tournament, Fundraising, and Clinic Development
-Managerial, Organizational, and Promotional Support
-Coach, Player, and Mentor Recruitment and Placement

ANDRE: When did you organize this organization? What are the age ranges?
JASON: I started Jr. Pro Sports in 2011 after talking with my family and praying for God’s direction in my life after losing my Job with the city. I had been working with kids of all ages at my home church Mt. Moriah East Baptist Church. Mt. Moriah East Church allowed me to operate the Jr. Grizzlies League my first year under their name. The demand and opportunities started opening new doors so I started Jr. Pro Sports. Dicks Sporting Goods, approved me for sponsorship the following year, this allowed me to bring business support to the children. Then my mom, sister, brother-in-law, girlfriend, church members, step out on faith with me to build this brand. I had felt such love and support. There is nothing like having your family believes in you and your dream. I felt like one of the kids in my league. My nephew was five years old and had a love for the game, so I started at that age and went to age 16. My son was 15 at the time so naturally I included that age group. So, I felt it was necessary to involve all ages.

ANDRE: On average, how many athletes do you generate annually?
JASON: I normally average between 60 to 125 kids annually that sign up under Jr. Pro Sports. Which comes out to five-to-12 teams under Jr. Pro Sports.Jason

ANDRE: What are the various activities involved?
JASON: We have numerous activities (sports and non-sports) that have been included in the Jr. Pro sports programs. We offer training camps, tournament development or promotion, league or sports program creation. We have worked with the University of Memphis on Ashley Furniture Bracketville tournament during the Tigers’ games. Our partnerships have helped us include school supply drives, coat drives, pictures, blood drives, blood pressure checks, and food drives. All kids that have participated have received pictures, knapsacks, T-shirts, Grizzlies tickets and trips to the FedExForum to watch the players up close. I am so blessed to have my organization impact, influence and inspire over a 1000 kids to love and most of all play basketball despite their talents or ability. A lot of children nowadays play basketball on video games. I pride this organization on opening the kids to the joys of healthy physical activities along with making them all feel like winners despite their physical talents, abilities, and differences.

ANDRE: When does your organization’s season start and end?
JASON: We have started our registration drive. We will begin a six-week training program for the kids. This gives us time to evaluate the kids and to also start getting them in shape and introducing them to the rules and fundamentals of basketball. We start having games in November on Saturdays. We play every Saturday except holiday weekends for 15 weeks. We usually end around the end February or beginning of March.

ANDRE: Does it offer a summer program?
JASON: In the summer, we do training for the kids to continue to develop. We also do tournaments in the summer. We have been in talks with Building Block Mentoring Program to institute mentoring and educational programs within the athletics. I normally do two tournaments in the summer. This year I assisted with Team Penny tournament and we also had the Dicks Sporting Goods Sponsored JPS invitational in June.

ANDRE: How is your league cost effective?
JASON: I try to make the activities we do affordable for the parents that participate. For example, most AAU programs have initial fee of about $200-$350 and up. Then you have to start factoring in tournament and travel cost. My Jr grizzlies fees totals about $300-$400 dollars over a 4 month period which include jersey, shorts, shoes, grizzlies tickets, game entry fees, pictures, knapsack, and banquet fees. We try to make this as affordable as possible so all kids no matter their economic resources can afford to support and watch their child. Being as though this is a developmental league and a lot of our parents and kids have never been involved in sports programming like this, they aren’t quite as knowledgeable about the cost, time, and commitment it takes to support their child athletics. So I like to believe that my league is both parent and player development.

ANDRE: How does Junior Pro Sports stand out above other organizations similar yours?
JASON: Jr. Pro Sports stands out is our ability and willingness to work with other organizations to create sporting events. We also standout because we Accept all kids, not just the star players. In our programs we focus on recruiting the non-talented. What makes Jr. Pro Sports unique and different is the passion and perseverance of putting on great athletic programs without having a definitive home base or home gym in which to work continuously all year round. It’s been numerous churches that allowed us use and access to the facilities, while including their kids in the activities. This is vital that we have the churches support. They have the resources to make the events a positive and impact community success. We have worked with Mt. Moriah East Baptist Church, Mississippi Blvd. Christian Church, New Bethel MB Church, Berean Baptist, Oak Grove Church, Holy Nations Church, and One Accord Ministries. All of these churches pride themselves on being a community cornerstone in their neighborhood.

ANDRE: Describe your relationship/partnership with the Memphis Grizzlies.
JASON: We have had a partnership with the memphis grizzlies organization for the past 4 years. We organize, operate, and manage a developmental basketball league under the Jr Grizzlies name. They provide us with jerseys and tickets. We provide them with a community event for the kids of Memphis. They have been completely supportive of Jr. Pro Sports efforts to give these kids the best professional basketball experience possible. We have had use the fed ex forum numerous times to have before game jamborees, mini tournaments, & exhibitions for my kids and others. When I started with them, I was the only black organization in Memphis to have a Jr. Grizzlies league. I’m proud to be there first to introduce this program to our inner-city youth. I started in OrangeMmound at my church. Now we have teams and kids from Whitehaven, Orange Mound, Cordova, Raleigh, East Memphis, and South Memphis involved.

ANDRE: Anything else you’d like Memphians to know about Jr. Pro Sports?
JASON: The future and goals of Jr. Pro Sports to get more high school students exposed to college recruiters and find a multiple court facility we call home to develop all our programs consistently. But most of all, Jr Pro Sports wants to continue to build our kids self esteem, confidence, talent, and character through our mentoring athletic programs.

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

 

 

 

Kevin Durant on criticism in bolting Team USA: ‘I’ve put in work for my country’

DALLAS — Kevin Durant insists he hasn’t lost any sleep.

Even after the Oklahoma City Thunder superstar and reigning NBA Most Valuable Player was criticized for withdrawing from Team USA before the FIBA World Cup in August, Durant on Friday said he wasn’t fazed by the backlash.

“To be honest, I really don’t care,” Durant told reporters after Friday’s shootaround in American Airlines Center. “I slept the same right after I made that decision.”
An eight-year NBA veteran, Durant withdrew from Team USA, citing “mental and physical fatigue.”

KEEP IT MOVING --- Despite being criticized for withdrawing from Team USA before the FIBA World Cup in August, Oklahoma City Thunder superstar and reigning NBA Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant on Friday said he wasn’t fazed by the backlash. (Photo by Jim Cowert/AP)

KEEP IT MOVING — Despite being criticized for withdrawing from Team USA before the FIBA World Cup in August, Oklahoma City Thunder superstar and reigning NBA Most Valuable Player Kevin Durant on Friday said he wasn’t fazed by the backlash. (Photo by Jim Cowert/AP)

Durant’s decision to leave the team came days after Paul George sustained an open tibia-fibula fracture. The Indiana Pacers star landed awkwardly at the base of a basket stanchion after fouling James Harden during a Las Vegas scrimmage and is expected to miss the entire 2014-15 season.

Durant’s departure followed previous withdrawals by All-Stars Kevin Love, Blake Griffin, LaMarcus Aldridge, and NBA Finals MVP Kawhi Leonard.

Consequently, various media pundits questioned Durant’s timing in leaving the team, going as far as to label the 2010 FIBA World Championship MVP a “quitter.”

“If you attended camp in Las Vegas, and if you called coach (Team USA coach) Mike Krzyzewski to ask for advice on how to be a “leader” when camp resumed in Chicago, and then you blindside Coach K and every other member of the national team, you have “quit,” longtime NBA writer Chris Sheridan of SheridanHoops.com wrote in an August 15 column.

Oklahoma City coach Scott Brooks on Friday refuted the criticism surrounding his star player, saying Durant’s decision to leave Team USA had “nothing to do with quitting.”

“Well, I haven’t heard anybody call him a quitter,” Brooks said. “Quitting is when you’re not playing, when you fall down and don’t get back up again. And that’s the last thing on Kevin’s mind. Kevin’s going to go down as one of the best players to ever play the game. And he’s obviously very talented and his work ethic is definitely at a high, high level. He goes into every offseason looking to add to his game on both ends (of the floor). “This year is no different. He’s gained some strength through all of the work he’s put in with our group. He’s come back. His attitude has always been great. His leadership skills have improved every year. I think he’s in a good position right now to lead us where we want to get to.”

Still, Durant, who scored 12 points on 4-of-8 shooting in 17 minutes in OKC’s 118-109 preseason win at Dallas Friday night, said he understood why he was criticized for bolting Team USA.

Many, in fact, sensed the five-time All-Star left the team, largely because he was affected by George’s gruesome injury.

 

While addressing the media on Friday, Durant said he understood why he was criticized for bolting Team USA in August. Many speculated the five-time All-Star left the team, largely because he was affected by Paul George’s season-ending leg injury during a scrimmage.

While addressing the media on Friday, Durant said he understood why he was criticized for bolting Team USA in August. Many speculated the five-time All-Star left the team, largely because he was affected by Paul George’s season-ending leg injury during a Las Vegas scrimmage. (Photo by C. L. Guy)

“I made the decision based on me, but it makes people uncomfortable,” Durant said. “So I understood and it comes with the whole territory when you do something like that. So I understand that. I try not to let it affect me and I’ll keep pushing. It’s one of those things where if you keep throwing rocks, it’s not going to penetrate because I know what I really do. I’ve put in work for my country.”

Since George’s injury, Durant said he often reaches out to the two-time All-Star, who appears to be recouping comfortably and haven’t ruled out a comeback this year.

During an interview last week, the 24-year-old George told Pacers.com’s Mark Montieth, “It’s very possible that I can play this season.”

“I talk to him all the time,” Durant said of George. “I call in and check on him. He looks like he’s doing extremely well. I saw him the other day walking with the boot. So that’s good to see that his recovery is coming along pretty well.”

As for the criticism that ensued amid a withdrawal from Team USA that “blindsided everyone,” according to Krzyzewski, Durant said that didn’t affect his offseason routine of doing the necessary things to ensure OKC remains a serious contender to compete for a championship.

Last year, the Thunder lost to eventual NBA champion San Antonio in six games in the Western Conference Finals.

“(The offseason) was fun,” Durant, the reigning NBA scoring champion, said. “I worked hard. I enjoyed my summer. That’s really it. I had a lot of off-the-court stuff to do. But what it really boiled down to was the court. I always make time to get out on the court.”

DreColumnAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Dallas-area hoops standout Shayla Dampier boasts dreams of playing for UConn

IRVING, Texas — Shayla Dampier’s heart goes out to Paul George.

 

TEXAS SIZE DREAMS --- MacArthur High basketball standout Shayla Dampiere boasts high hopes of playing for UConn once her prep career ends. (Photos submitted by Lisa Cooper)

TEXAS SIZE DREAMS — MacArthur High basketball standout Shayla Dampier boasts high hopes of playing for UConn once her prep career ends. (Photos submitted by Lisa Cooper)

When George, a two-time NBA All-Star, landed awkwardly at the base of a basket stanchion after fouling James Harden and suffered a compound fracture of both bones in his lower right leg during a Team USA Blue and White scrimmage August 1 in Las Vegas, Dampier was amongst the millions of viewers who witnessed the freak injury live.

Dampier, a rising sophomore combo guard for MacArthur High in Irving, Texas, said that while she was somewhat bothered by George’s injury, his setback was, by and large, reminiscent of her season-ending injury last year.

“It was shocking to see somebody in the NBA have to go through something like that,” Dampier said of George, who is expected to miss the entire 2014-15 season. “You know, you don’t respect it. I just kind of cringed and was kind of in shock. After I watched the video a couple of times, I could feel what he felt like. After an injury like, I knew he would never be the same.”

For Dampier, who has been playing competitive basketball since she was seven years old, while she contends injuries such as the one George sustained customarily gives way a psychological effect on athletes, she believes players can still manage to perform effectively. Last summer, during an AAU game in Arlington as a member of the North Texas Strive, Dampier’s left knee buckled while converting a layup.

“I was mostly in pain and fear,” Dampier said of her injury. “I really didn’t know what it was.”

As swelling to her knee steadily increased, Dampier underwent an MRI three days later. Consequently, it was revealed that she had torn her ACL, thus sidelining her for all of her freshman campaign for MacArthur. For Dampier, the season-ending injury was too much stomach.

“I wasn’t too sure if I’d play again,” Dampier said.

Fortunately for Dampiere, a Seattle native, after undergoing successful surgery and months of rehabilitation, Dampiere’s recouping comfortably from her injury. Nowadays, she has begun to partake in regular workout and conditioning sessions. While doctors have yet to clear her to rejoin the Lady Cardinals --- who open the season November 25 when they Plano --- Dampiere is expected to be cleared to return to full, contact drills before preseason practices begin.

Fortunately for Dampier, a Seattle native, after undergoing successful surgery and months of rehabilitation, Dampier’s recouping comfortably from her injury. Nowadays, she has begun to partake in regular workout and conditioning sessions. While doctors have yet to clear her to rejoin the Lady Cardinals — who open the season November 25 when they Plano — Dampier is expected to be cleared to return to full, contact drills before preseason practices begin.

Fortunately for the Seattle native, after undergoing successful surgery and months of rehabilitation, Dampier’s recouping comfortably from her injury. Nowadays, she has begun to partake in regular workout and conditioning sessions. While doctors have yet to clear her to rejoin the Lady Cardinals — who open the season November 25 when they Plano — Dampier is expected to be cleared to return to full, contact drills before preseason practices begin.

“I never thought that she wouldn’t play again,” said Lisa Cooper, Dampier’s mother and arguably her grandest supporter. “I just knew it was just a setback for a (comeback). I knew because of my faith, I just prayed about it.”

Days after her daughter’s injury, Cooper fielded an email from a close acquaintance about the torn ACL former UConn basketball star Sue Bird suffered during her illustrious tenure with the tradition-rich Lady Huskies.

“It was very encouraging,” Cooper said of the Bird’s story in which the current Seattle Storm star recovered from a torn ACL. “It showed (Dampier) that this doesn’t have to be the end.”

Which is, of course, among the reasons she is destined to make up for lost time in this, the upcoming season.

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson also covers the NBA’s Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, email him at andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist

Bethany College’s Leaky Jones drawing comparisons to ex-Memphis star D-Rose

For Calique Jones, it’s a question he’s been asked quite frequently in recent years.

Do you believe you were overlooked by Division I colleges coming out of high school?

FRESH START --- Though playing basketball for a Division III private school isn’t as glamorous as the putting his skills on display at the Division I ranks, many believe the sky’s the limit for a speedy floor general such Bethany College's Jones.  (Photos submitted by Mia Crow)

FRESH START — Though playing basketball for a Division III private school isn’t as glamorous as the putting his skills on display at the Division I ranks, many believe the sky’s the limit for a speedy floor general such Bethany College’s Jones. (Photos submitted by Mia Crow)

As usual, the 18-year-old Jones’ response is virtually the same.

“Yes I thought I was overlooked because I’m a good player especially at the point guard position,” Jones told Bleacher Report during a recent interview.

To get a full understanding of why Jones contends his immense basketball skills were overlooked by college scouts as a prep standout, look no further than the strides he’s made in recent years.

For starters, Jones first began playing competitive hoops when he was five years old. Consequently, his mother, Mia Crow, helped his to enhance his mechanics by signing him up camps and, ultimately, an AAU team in the Pittsburgh area.

He is widely remembered for having played for the Dejuan Blair All-Stars AAU squad and evolving as a standout at Obama Academy of International Studies.

Today, Jones is a freshman at Bethany College in West Virginia. The oldest private college in the state, Bethany has a student body of approximately 1,030 and is a Division III institution that is a member of the Eastern College Athletic Conference (or ECAC).

Though playing basketball for a Division III private school isn’t as glamorous as the putting his skills on display at the Division I ranks, many believe the sky’s the limit for a speedy floor general such Jones.

Among the reasons is that this vibrant, streaky 6’ 0” point man is armed with the ability to create his own shoot much like a swingman and has demonstrated time and again the ability to become a facilitator on the floor.

In a nutshell, as Jones goes, so does his supporting cast.

LASTING IMPRESSION --- With preseason camps just days away, Jones said is expects to assume a key role and contribute immediately for a Bethany team he hopes will compete an ECAC title this season.

LASTING IMPRESSION — With preseason camps just days away, Jones said is expects to assume a key role and contribute immediately for a Bethany team he hopes will compete an ECAC title this season.

“I honestly do think I can have an impact on this team,” Jones said. “My coach and I really close yet but soon we’ll be really close.”

While Jones continues to establish a solid rapport with the Bethany coaching staff as well as become acclimated to college life, he acknowledges his primary focus is to concentrate on academics and polish his skills as fall preseason practices loom.

To his credit, many have likened Jones’ skills to NBA stars Derrick Rose and John Wall, in large part because of his immense quickness, scoring and ball-handling ability, not to mention his keen ability to penetrate to the basketball.

“Those two are my top point guard that I base myself off of,” Jones said of Rose and Walls. “I believe I play just like both of them from quickness to natural speed to shooting…all of that. I work hard to be like them and I actually got some compliments saying that my speed reminds people of D-Rose.”

So how exactly did Jones wound of falling through the cracks and going virtually unnoticed by major college scouts?

“My grades weren’t close enough to get accepted into the (Division I) school so they kind of just backed off if that makes sense,” said Jones, assessing why he sensed he was passed up by bigger schools. “I have to work extremely hard…no slacking at all.”

Although he acknowledged that Bethany was his “last option” during a recruiting process in which he generated interest from UMass, South Florida, Norfolk State, and Robert Morris, Jones said his primary focus is to do what is necessary to help his the Bison excel.

Although he acknowledged that Bethany was his “last option” during a recruiting process in which he generated interest from UMass, South Florida, Norfolk State, and Robert Morris, Jones said his primary focus is to do what is necessary to help his the Bison excel.

Among those whom have supported Jones intensely as he prepares to play his first collegiate game November 15 when the Bison host Frostburg State is his mother.

Like many of Jones’ peers, Crow senses the bigger schools past up a golden opportunity to acquire a true freshman.

“Calique was a major factor in the success of his high school team as well as his AAU team,” Crow said. “He competed last year on a national level, played tough teams in front of many top Division I coaches, and he did really well. Calique is a born leader and dedicated to the sport of basketball and he would be such an asset to any team he plays for.”

With preseason camps just days away, Jones said is expects to assume a key role and contribute immediately for a Bethany team he hopes will compete an ECAC title this season.

Although he acknowledged that Bethany was his “last option” during a recruiting process in which he generated interest from UMass, South Florida, Norfolk State, and Robert Morris, Jones said his primary focus is to do what is necessary to help his the Bison excel.

As for a basketball future at the professional level, Jones would be the first to tell you that is on his list of short-term goals.

How else to explain why he’s drawn comparisons to Rose and Walls?

“Playing professionally will be important,” Jones said. “I just want to make sure my mom is going to be good, my brothers will be good and my friends.”

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson also covers the NBA’s Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, email him at andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist

 

Tyson Chandler thrilled to be back in Dallas after title run three years ago

NBA SOUTHWEST DIVISION REPORT 

DALLAS — As far as Tyson Chandler is concerned, it’s the “little things” that matter.

Such was the case when Chandler in June was traded back to the Dallas Mavericks after a three-year absence from the team.

Within hours after news spread of his return to the organization, Chandler fielded text messages and emails from close acquaintances with whom he established close-knit bonds during his lone season with the team in 2010-11.

HAPPY RETURN --- During the Dallas Mavericks' Media Day session Monday at American Airlines Center, veteran center Tyson Chandler said he's happy to have reunited with the team he helped capture its first NBA championship three years ago. A 13-year pro, Chandler was traded back to the Mavs in June. (Photo by Andrew Jackson, Jr.)

HAPPY RETURN — During the Dallas Mavericks’ Media Day session Monday at American Airlines Center, veteran center Tyson Chandler said he’s happy to have reunited with the team he helped capture its first NBA championship three years ago. A 13-year pro, Chandler was traded back to the Mavs in June. (Photo by Andrew Jackson, Jr.)

It was, in fact, a memorable campaign for Chandler, considering the 13-year-veteran helped propel Dallas to its first world championship in franchise history when the Mavericks upset the heavy-favorite Miami Heat in six games in the NBA Finals.

So it was no surprise that within days upon his return to the Mavericks, the city of Dallas showed their appreciation to the All-Star center by posting a picture of Chandler wearing a Mavs jersey on an electronic billboard near American Airlines Center that reads: WELCOME BACK, TYSON!

A career that includes stints with Chicago, New Orleans, Charlottle, and New York, Chandler said returning to Dallas has brought about a feeling he describes as “surreal.”

“It feels great to be back,” Chandler said during Monday’s Media Day session at American Airlines Center. “At first, it was surreal. I was a visitor for the last three years. But it’s great to be back and see familiar guys.”

While addressing reporters, Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle said virtually everywhere he’s gone of late, Chandler emerged as the center of conversation.

“He’s the most popular one-year player of any franchise in the history of professional sports,” Carlisle jokingly said of Chandler. “In fact, at a couple of speaking engagements I’ve had over the past couple of weeks, I said, ‘Tyson Chandler’s back.’ And folks go crazy. He’s the kind of guy that you can’t help but love to watch because of his approach and enthusiasm. You know, he’s winner.”

Not to mention a fan favorite, given the courtesies he’s acquired since his unexpected return to Big D.

POSTSEASON FORM --- Having started in each of the Mavs’ 21 postseason games in 2011, Chandler averaged 32.4 minutes, his best game coming in Game 4 of the NBA Finals when he registered 13 points and 16 rebounds to help Dallas even the series. (Photo courtesy of Reuters)

POSTSEASON FORM — Having started in each of the Mavs’ 21 postseason games in 2011, Chandler averaged 32.4 minutes, his best game coming in Game 4 of the NBA Finals when he registered 13 points and 16 rebounds to help Dallas even the series. (Photo courtesy of Reuters)

Because of the favorable impression Chandler left with the team three years ago, it’s safe to assume both sides were grateful to rekindle after Chandler announced six months after the Mavs’ title run that he had agreed to a four-year deal with the New York Knicks worth a reported $58 million.

Acquired by Dallas on July 13, 2010 in exchange for Matt Carroll, Erick Dampier, and Eduardo Najera, Chandler started 74 regular season games for the Mavs, averaging 10.1 points, 9.4 rebounds, and 27.8 minutes per game.

He was especially efficient during the team’s title run, particularly as the centerpiece on the defensive end, where he was forced to occupy more minutes because of the injury to backup center Brendan Haywood.

Having started in each of the Mavs’ 21 postseason games, Chandler averaged 32.4 minutes, his best outing coming in Game 4 of the NBA Finals when he registered 13 points and 16 rebounds to help Dallas even the series.

While Chandler admittedly didn’t know what to expect during his first run with the Mavs, he doesn’t shy away from the notion that much is expected of him this time around.

Chandler was especially efficient during the Mavs’ title run, particularly as the centerpiece on the defensive end, considering he was forced to occupy more minutes because of the injury to backup center Brendan Haywood. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP)

Chandler was especially efficient during the Mavs’ title run, particularly as the centerpiece on the defensive end, considering he was forced to occupy more minutes because of the injury to backup center Brendan Haywood. (Photo by Tony Gutierrez/AP)

“Obviously, having been here and winning a championship, the expectations are a little different,” Chandler said. “There are a bunch of new faces. But the motivation is still the same. And the expectations within me are still the same if not more.”

Among those who appears mostly intrigued by Chandler’s return is Mavs franchise player Dirk Nowitzki. In July, Nowitzki restructured his contract, thus allowing the team to acquire a number of key players, most notably Chandler, Chandler Parsons (from Houston), and Jameer Nelson (from Orlando).

“I’m looking forward to playing with him,” Nowitzki said of Chandler. “Obviously, the chemistry was there a few years ago, so I’m not worried about.”

As the Mavs open training camp Tuesday morning, among the key challenges for Carlisle is to devise ways to distribute minutes for a roster that boasts immense depth. Conversely, Carlisle acknowledges because of the key offseason acquisitions, much of the pressure won’t fall solely on Nowitzki to generate the bulk of the offense and on Chandler to steer the Mavs defensively.

Dallas opens preseason play October 7 when it hosts Houston. The Mavs’ season-opener is October 28 at defending NBA champion San Antonio.

“We’ll make sure (Chandler’s) minutes are reasonable, because we don’t want to overtax anybody too soon,” Carlisle said.

Regardless of how the Mavs choose to utilize Chandler this season, one thing is seemingly for certain: The smile he exhibited Monday while addressing the assembled media was indicative of just how delightful he is to have landed back at his old stomping ground.

“It’s so funny because I only spent one year here and everybody thinks I’ve spent my entire career here,” Chandler said. “You know, everybody thinks I was here four or five or six years. But it was just one, long, really incredible year.”

A year Mavs fans will never forget.

DrePicAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to andre@memphisport.net. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.