Shaw (Miss.) High basketball star Anthony Davis, Jr. following in footsteps of his father

DALLAS — Anthony Davis, Jr. is a bad man.

Bad as in good, mind you.

bbbbbNot only is Davis a rising senior and the catalyst for a Shaw (Mississippi) High School basketball team that’s coached by his father, Anthony Davis, Sr., but given his well-publicized track record on the amateur hoops circuit in recent years, it’s safe to assume this athletically-gifted prodigy figures to be suiting up in a major college basketball uniform in a little less than two years.

For starters, Anthony Davis — widely known as “Little Tony” amongst family and friends — has become a fixture at Cleveland Cavaliers veteran swingman Mo Williams Academy that’s based in Dallas-Fort Worth area, where he is taught everything from aim to balance athletics and personal development, development as it pertains to the ability to set realistic but challenging individual goals, development as it relates to self-discipline and a commitment to personal success, not to mention a development with regards to respect and appreciation for others and the game as well as his ability to exhibit good sportsmanship.

JUST SHOWING OFF --- In leading Shaw to a 20-9 record this past season, Shaw High basketball star Anthony Davis, Jr. was as good as advertised, having averaged a team-best 14.1 points while appearing in 28 of the Hawks’ 29 games (according to Maxpreps.com). Add to the fact that this 5-foot-9 swingman helped propel his father’s team on an impressive postseason run, coupled with the efficient work he’s put in this offseason, and it’s no wonder that in all likelihood, scouts will surely come calling sooner than he thinks.

JUST SHOWING OFFIn leading Shaw to a 20-9 record this past season, Shaw High basketball star Anthony Davis, Jr. was as good as advertised, having averaged a team-best 12.7 points while appearing in 28 of the Hawks’ 29 games (according to Maxpreps.com).
Add to the fact that this 5-foot-9 swingman helped propel his father’s team on an impressive postseason run, coupled with the efficient work he’s put in this offseason, and it’s no wonder that in all likelihood, scouts will surely come calling sooner than he thinks.

“I’m an outstanding person, always willing to put in overtime work in my craft,” Anthony Davis, Jr. told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson on Tuesday. “I’m a hard worker and a great leader on the team.”

Fortunately for the 17-year-old guard, his overall body of work on the hardwood in the Magnolia State hasn’t gone unnoticed, not by a long shot.

That’s because Little Tony is currently amongst 150 prep players who are showcasing their skills and mechanics in the Second Annual ScoutsFocus All-American Camp in Charlottesville, Virginia.

A three-day that ran from June 13-15, Little Tony was amongst 5-10 players invited from each showcase location.

Among ScoutsFocus’ notable alums is former University of Kansas and current Minnesota Timberwolves star Andrew Wiggins.

Generally, because Little Tony has enjoyed a wealth of success with a full season left of major high school ball, many recruiting analysts believe he will only add to his already favorable stock.

In leading Shaw to a 20-9 record this past season, Little Tony was as good as advertised, having averaged a team-best 12.7 points while appearing in 28 of the Hawks’ 29 games (according to Maxpreps.com).

ddddAdd to the fact that this 5-foot-9 swingman helped propel his father’s team on an impressive postseason run, coupled with the efficient work he’s put in this offseason, and it’s no wonder that in all likelihood, scouts will surely come calling sooner than he thinks.

That, after all, will surface as a good problem, of sorts, for a kid who’s clinging to massive dreams of playing on college basketball’s grandest stage.

“I’ve been training every day at MWA (in Dallas) and conditioning every morning,” Little Tony said. “Whatever college gets me will be inheriting a great listener, team leader and hard worker. It’s a dream that I need to accomplish to get to the next level of play that I will push forward to play on, which is the NBA.”

As his old man tells it, anything’s possible for his giftedly-talented son, who has been nothing short impressive during his tenure at Shaw as well as the AAU circuit.

FAMILY FOCUS --- “I think the sky is the limit for him because of his work ethic,” Anthony Davis, Sr. said. “He wants to be better than his dad. I think that's what drives him. I always push him to better than me.”

FAMILY FOCUS“I think the sky is the limit for him because of his work ethic,” Anthony Davis, Sr. said. “He wants to be better than his dad. I think that’s what drives him. I always push him to better than me.”

“We’ll, I don’t watch him from the bleachers,” Anthony Davis, Sr., a McDonald’s All-American nominee in 1994 and an All SWAC player at the Mississippi Valley State University, said in critiquing his son’s overall progress. “I watch him from the sideline because I’m his coach. He has grown to be a really good basketball and baseball player.”

All of which practically sums up why this hoops prodigy will undoubtedly be heard loud and clear amongst scouts and recruiters in the foreseeable future.

So stay tuned.

In case you haven’t heard, Little Tony is about to do some big things.

“I think the sky is the limit for him because of his work ethic,” Anthony Davis, Sr. said. “He wants to be better than his dad. I think that’s what drives him. I always push him to better than me.”

Again…

Stay tuned.

In case you haven’t heard, Little Tony is about to do some big things.

How many times we’ve got to say it?



MrJohnsonEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Mid-South-area prep basketball standout Quintiyus Causey making noise in Mississippi and Texas

For a 16-year-old rising junior basketball player who boasts lofty aspirations of putting his immense skills on display at the collegiate level, Cleveland (Mississippi) High’s Quintiyus Causey seems to already know how to handle the sometimes tough and challenging media.

Take, for instance, how Causey eloquently responded Monday afternoon when asked what it is he’d like for college scouts and recruiters to know about him.

aaaaTo his credit, he didn’t hold back, nor did he waver or dodge around with his answers.

Rather, he was forthright and to the point.

“(I’m a player) who is laid back, willing to learn, very coachable, able to take constructive criticism, ready to work, and give my all on and off the basketball court,” Causey told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson.

STOCK RISING --- In helping the upstart Cleveland High to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Quintiyus Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial senior campaign.

STOCK RISING — In helping the upstart Cleveland High to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Quintiyus Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial senior campaign.

To get a thorough concept of why Causey appears to harbor a wealth of poise and resolve at such a pivotal stage in his young basketball career, look no further than his stellar effort this past season for Cleveland.

Much to the delight of Cleveland coach James Strong’s Wildcats, Causey was nothing short of remarkable for a team that managed to manufacture the .500 mark by season’s end.

In helping the upstart Wildcats to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial junior campaign.

In emerging as one of the team’s marquee players, Causey appeared in each of Cleveland’s 28 games and averaged 14.1 points, second only to Ellis Townsend II’s 15.1 points per contest.

According to Maxpreps.com, Causey was one of four Cleveland players to see action in all 28 games, a trend that, according to his mother, Colleen Watson, provided her son with an array of confidence in the process.

“When I’m in the stands watching my son play, it brings joy to my heart,” Watson said. “I’m yelling and screaming throughout the games for the team as well as my son. I just continue to thank God daily for continuing his interest for basketball.”

By and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state.

TEXAS SIZE IMPACT --- By and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state. Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters.

TEXAS SIZE IMPACTBy and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state.
Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters.

Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team coached by Adarrial Coleman and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters, considering all this does is win.

So much so that his AAU squad has collected an assortment of championship hardware.

Oh…and let’s not forget Causey’s keen ability to handle the media.

Need more proof?

Just listen to him.

aaassssss“Preparing for my senior year, I know I have to go out with a bang, so I would say (in order to progress) spending countless hours in the gym and in the weight room,” Causey said. “College basketball is very intense. Everything you do is done with a purpose. The things you work on in practice are not just to go through the motion, but you do those things to get something out of it. I’ve always been the type of player that if the game is not taken seriously, I don’t want to play and in college basketball, nothing is for fun and I want to be in an environment where I can play against guys who are said to be some of that nation’s best and let my game introduce me.”

Displaying her signature smile and customary support of Causey, Watson relishes the fact that her son has greatly handled the major high school/AAU basketball maturation processes with ease.

MOM KNOWS BEST ---"The sky is the limit for my son because he's dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Colleen Watson said.

MOM KNOWS BEST“The sky is the limit for my son because he’s dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Colleen Watson said.

She doesn’t expect him to let up anytime soon.

Look out Mississippi and Texas.

Chances are hoops-crazed fans haven’t heard the last of this athletically-talent kid whose best and brightest days are well ahead of him.

“The sky is the limit for my son because he’s dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Watson said.

Credit this basketball mom for always dishing out the biggest assist to an athletically-gifted kid who’s making a strong case that he’s destined to play at the collegiate level.



MrJohnsonEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

MID-SOUTH RECRUITING: Cedric Rowzee’s best football days are ahead of him for Chicago’s Wheaton-Warrenville South

qqqqqqqqqTo his credit, Cedric Rowzee enjoyed a freshman campaign in which he was afforded the golden opportunity to put his skills on display for Chicago’s Wheaton Warrenville South High’s track and field squad.

Now in what has been an already busy offseason, Rowzee is clinging to lofty expectations of doing the necessary things that will enable him to assume more reps for Tigers coach Ron Muhitch’s varsity football roster.

A slim, but speedy 5-foot-9, 135-pound athlete, Rowzee starred mostly on Wheaton Warrenville’s junior varsity squad, but managed to witness limited action on varsity.

PUTTING IN WORK --- To his credit, Cedric Rowzee enjoyed a freshman campaign in which he was afforded the golden opportunity to put his skills on display for Chicago’s Wheaton Warrenville South High’s track and field squad. Now in what has been an already busy offseason, Rowzee is clinging to lofty expectations of doing the necessary things that will enable him to assume more reps for Tigers coach Ron Muhitch’s varsity football roster.

PUTTING IN WORKTo his credit, Cedric Rowzee enjoyed a freshman campaign in which he was afforded the golden opportunity to put his skills on display for Chicago’s Wheaton Warrenville South High’s track and field squad. Now in what has been an already busy offseason, Rowzee is clinging to lofty expectations of doing the necessary things that will enable him to assume more reps for Tigers coach Ron Muhitch’s varsity football roster.

That alone, in his estimation, was enough to fuel his desire to partake in what has been an efficient, productive offseason for the two-way athlete, in large part because he’s convinced his best and brightest days as a rising prep athlete are well ahead of him.

“It was a great way to start my career off as a freshman being on the football team and varsity track team,” Rowzee, in assessing his freshman season, told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson during a recent interview.

As far as Rowee and his mother, Tinisha Akers-Hood, are concerned, that Rowee played sparingly on varsity essentially is a precursor to what Muhitch and his staff can expect in the coming seasons.

While Rowsee has yet to garner any attention from college scouts and recruiters, he’s adamant that will all change as he continues to broaden his mechanics, particularly on the gridiron.

“I haven’t gotten any letters from any colleges, but I will be attending a few college camps (over the summer),” Rowzee said.

RUN ROWZEE RUN: http://www.hudl.com/athlete/5589514/cedric-rowzee.

As he awaits with great expectancy some form or feedback from colleges, Rowzee hinted that it’s not too early to audition, thus make a favorable case that he’s equipped to play at the collegiate level.

“I’m coachable and I’m very competitive,” Rowzee said. I lifted (weights) three days a week. My biggest strength is speed and my reaction time. My weakness would be my size.”

As he look ahead to attending a few football camps in the coming weeks, Rowzee acknowledged that he’s remaining hopeful that those who monitor his skills won’t make much of issue of his size.

MOM KNOWS BEST --- As far as Rowee and his mother, Tinisha Akers-Hood, are concerned, that Rowee played sparingly on varsity essentially is a precursor to what Muhitch and his staff can expect in the coming seasons.

MOM KNOWS BEST — As far as Rowee and his mother, Tinisha Akers-Hood, are concerned, that Rowee played sparingly on varsity essentially is a precursor to what Muhitch and his staff can expect in the coming seasons.

“God did it,” said Akers-Hood, when asked what her overall reaction to her son’s rise as a multi-sport athlete. “I’m a single mom and I love sports Both his father and I were track stars.

As it pertains to continuing to exemplify athletic success, Akers-Hood said that health and hitting the books are key.

“(I pray) God protects him so he doesn’t get hurt,” said Akers-Hood, “and I’m praying he scores (well on college entrance exams).”

In echoing virtually everyone else who have witnessed her progress and thrive as a young athlete, Akers-Hood obviously shares the same favorable assessment.

“Cedric is supernaturally talented,” she said.  “He wouldn’t have (all this talent) without Christ, Who strengths him.”

Not to mention these assortment of golden opportunities to put his skills on display for Chicago’s Wheaton Warrenville South High’s track and field squad.



MrJohnsonEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Dallas-area prep basketball player Roland Jamison aiming to atone for trying sophomore season

DALLAS — First the bad news.

Roland Jamison endured a somewhat challenging sophomore season for Mansfield (Texas) Summit High, considering he was hampered mostly by a foot injury that reduced his effectiveness.

Now the good news.

Dallas2This athletically-gifted kid, who was installed as part of the Jaguars’ varsity roster this past season, has a lot of major prep basketball ahead of him.

“It was quite a learning season for me to get a feel of the varsity floor and also kind of short since a foot injury that interrupted most of my season,” Jamison told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson during a recent interview. “But now since we didn’t make playoffs, it made me work harder for next season to get our team better.”

All things considered, the only way for Jamison to go as he continues to lure the attention of college scouts and recruiters is up, especially after a rather stormy campaign that enabled him to greatly put basketball — and life — in its proper perspective.

For starters, the 6-foot-2, 180-pound swingman — who’s widely known as “Ro” — came away rather inspired and enthused about this offseason, in large part because his continuous competitive basketball play on the Dallas-Fort Worth-area AAU circuit will allow him golden opportunities to erase the memory of what was a tumultuous sophomore campaign.

Add to the fact that Jamison has a solid support system that’s headed by his father, Danny Jamison, and it’s no wonder why this prep basketball standout is eager to suit up for Summit coach Jason Mutterer’s team next season.

How compelling that the good news far outweighs the bad.

“I will spend the whole summer pushing every day to get better,” said Roland Jamison, adding that he is a “very humble and respectful” person.

His positive attitude, coupled with his a reputation that suggest that Roland Jamison is coachable, could prove beneficial for a kid who boasts lofty aspirations of play basketball at the collegiate level.

Dallas“The sky’s the limit for Roland because his drive, determination, work ethic, and willingness to get better are going get him to that next level,” Danny Jamison said. “I don’t know many kids who, instead go out partying or doing anything else, would rather go to the gym and put up literally hundreds of shots with his coach after playing ball all day against older competition. And this is a regular occurrence…every time we talk, he’s always telling me what part of his game he has worked on that day and always says to me, ‘I got to get better. I got to keep working hard at it.’ And, as a parent, that makes you proud.’”

Now that Summit is a couple of months removed from its season that ended with an unsatisfactory 11-21 mark, Roland Jamison has now shifted his focus on AAU ball and summer camps, two additional avenues that figure to allow him to generate even more exposure.

Roland Jamison has been invited to The Elite 100 Camp, and said other formal invitations will likely follow.

In the meantime, he reiterated that his primary focus is to get better — better in that he’s steadfastly aiming to draw the attention of colleges scouts.

“I would like them to know that I’m a hard and effective player that strives to get better on and off the court,” said Roland Jamison, who owns a cumulative grade point average of 4.0. “I’ll be working out every day on shooting and defense.”

That, after all, is a good thing.

That, after all, is good news, too.

News that far outweighs the bad.



MrJohnsonEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Fisk University point guard LaMetria Dunn making her presence felt in the Music City

DUNN DEAL --- Former Memphis Fairley High standout LaMetria Dunn appeared in each of Fisk’s 29 games this past season and, as expected, she was often as good as advertised, having averaged better than six points per game while shooting nearly 50 percent from three-point range.

DUNN DEALFormer Memphis Fairley High standout LaMetria Dunn appeared in each of Fisk’s 29 games this past season and, as expected, she was often as good as advertised, having averaged better than six points per game while shooting nearly 50 percent from three-point range.

If anybody knows LaMetria Dunn, it’s Curtis Jones.

Jones is longtime Memphis-area AAU basketball coach who was afforded the opportunity of coaching Dunn from the time she entered sixth grade until she graduated from Fairley High School.

On Wednesday, or approximately two months removed from Dunn having completed her junior season at Fisk University in Nashville, Jones was asked to assess the overall progress of his former player.

“There are no words to express how pleased and impressed I am with her growth on and off the court,” Jones told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson. “In my 15 years of coaching, I have the most personal relationship with her that goes beyond basketball. LaMetria is like my 3rd daughter.”

To her credit, the 22-year-old Dunn has given her former coach and her mother, Tondelayo Williams, something about which to be proud.

For starters, Dunn, a 5-foot-4, 140-pound point guard, enjoyed a favorable tenure at Dyersburg State Community College prior to extending her collegiate basketball career at Fisk.

To her credit, she showed no signs of a letdown this past season for the NAIA member Lady Bulldogs, having emerged as a key contributor for a Fisk team that ended the season with an 11-18 mark.

Although the Lady Bulldogs failed to manufacture a winning campaign in 2015-16, Dunn admittedly still came away with more highs than lows in her first full season at the school.

“Progression (was the biggest thing),” Dunn said. “I’m more of threat as far as a scoring point guard. I worked out fairly every day, whether it was shooting and ball-handling or in the weight room getting some reps in.”

SHE AIN'T DUNN --- Considering room for improvement is always an ambition, surely, amongst the things about which Dunn will be aiming to fine-tune is her ability to make free throws. This past season, she shot an unsatisfactory 49.1 percent from the free throw line.

SHE AIN’T DUNNConsidering room for improvement is always an ambition, surely, amongst the things about which Dunn will be aiming to fine-tune is her ability to make free throws.
This past season, she shot an unsatisfactory 49.1 percent from the free throw line.

Dunn appeared in each of Fisk’s 29 games this past season and, as expected, she was often as good as advertised, having averaged better than six points per game while shooting nearly 50 percent from three-point range.

She finished in double figures twice as a junior, with her season-best of 13 points coming in a Philander Smith College of Arkansas.

Considering room for improvement is always an ambition, surely, amongst the things about which Dunn will be aiming to fine-tune is her ability to make free throws.

This past season, she shot an unsatisfactory 49.1 percent from the free throw line.

Even aside from her frequent offseason workouts, this summer will undoubtedly be a busy one for Dunn, who boasts lofty aspirations of becoming a medical doctor.

Dunn, who holds an Associates of Science Degree from Dyersburg State, is a Biology major at Fisk.

DR. DUNN --- By and large, although she has one more year of college eligibility remaining, Dunn doesn’t shy away from the notion that she’s already planning for life after basketball. Even aside from her frequent offseason workouts, this summer will undoubtedly be a busy one for Dunn, who boasts lofty aspirations of becoming a medical doctor.

DR. DUNNBy and large, although she has one more year of college eligibility remaining, Dunn doesn’t shy away from the notion that she’s already planning for life after basketball. Even aside from her frequent offseason workouts, this summer will undoubtedly be a busy one for Dunn, who boasts lofty aspirations of becoming a medical doctor.

“I will spend my summer doing an internship and hopefully I’d be accepted into the graduate school of my choice,” Dunn said. “I will be doing a volunteer summer camps this summer at the McCabe Center in Nashville.”

By and large, although she has one more year of college eligibility remaining, Dunn doesn’t shy away from the notion that she’s already planning for life after basketball.

“On a billboard in Dyersburg, Tennessee, I’m being recognized as a student first and then an athlete,” Dunn explained.

Of course, atoning for last year’s losing record is a key goal also, she said.

“At the end of the game, when the clock strikes zero and the buzzer has sounded, my objective is to have a win, no matter how many I score or how many my teammates score,” Dunn said. “All I will do seek is the W and walk off the court knowing I gave everything I could.”

Something about she has doing since her AAU coach first discovered her immense skills back when she entered sixth grade.



AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Marion (Ark.) High senior Allen Latham, Jr. generating late interests from colleges

STOCK RISING --- To his credit, he certainly appears on track to possibly suiting up in a college uniform in the coming months, considering Allen Latham, Jr. was invited recently to put his mechanics on display before the coaching staff at Harding University, a Division 2 school in Searcy, Arkansas.

STOCK RISINGTo his credit, he certainly appears on track to possibly suiting up in a college uniform in the coming months, considering Allen Latham, Jr. was invited recently to put his mechanics on display before the coaching staff at Harding University, a Division 2 school in Searcy, Arkansas.

Allen Latham, Jr. was asked recently to assess his senior campaign for the Marion (Arkansas) High basketball team.

“I think it went really well,” Latham, Jr. told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson. Then after pausing momentarily, Latham Jr. recalled arguably his grandest memory of his final season of major prep basketball.

“I had a breakout game of 31 points and being the team captain, that led to me being a leader on and off the court,” Latham, Jr. said.

Now that his prep hoops tenure has ended, the 6-foot-2, 187-pound swingman is now clinging to lofty aspirations of extending his athletic talents at the collegiate level.

To his credit, he certainly appears on track to possibly suiting up in a college uniform in the coming months, considering Latham, Jr. was invited recently to put his mechanics on display before the coaching staff at Harding University, a Division 2 school in Searcy, Arkansas.

Although the 18-year-old Latham, Jr. has yet to garner any official offers, he has acquired some interest and qualified academically, according to his father, Allen Latham, Sr.

DAD KNOWS BEST --- Although the 18-year-old Latham, Jr. has yet to garner any official offers, he has qualified academically, according to his father, Allen Latham, Sr. For the past couple of weeks, Latham, Sr. has been quite complimentary of his son, saying, among other things, that he has exceeded expectations on and off the court and that he is worthy of having a shot of fulfilling his dream of playing college basketball.

DAD KNOWS BESTAlthough the 18-year-old Latham, Jr. has yet to garner any official offers, he has qualified academically, according to his father, Allen Latham, Sr. For the past couple of weeks, Latham, Sr. has been quite complimentary of his son, saying, among other things, that he has exceeded expectations on and off the court and that he is worthy of having a shot of fulfilling his dream of playing college basketball.

For the past couple of weeks, Latham, Sr. has been quite complimentary of his son, saying, among other things, that he has exceeded expectations on and off the court and that he is worthy of having a shot of fulfilling his dream of playing college basketball.

“He began playing (basketball) at the age of six,” Latham, Sr. said of his son, whom he said also generated interest from Arkansas Tech and Ecclesia College in Springdale, Arkansas.

Ever since his child first dribbled and launched a basketball toward a goal, the elder Latham knew his son would ultimately find his niche in the sport.

This past season, unlike any other, it seemed he had done just that, something by which he hopes college scouts and recruiters will subsequently take into account in the foreseeable future.

“He has a lot of talent and potential to do well in this sport,” Latham, Sr. said. “He had (a number of) good games (this past season), he didn’t get hurt, and he played team ball.”

Indeed he did.

pat3In leading coach Irving Clay’s Patriots in scoring at better than 13 points per game, Latham appeared in 25 of Marion’s 26 outings and, by season’s end, the Patriots’ late-season surge gave way to a 14-12 finish and a No. 43 overall ranking in the state in a final poll released by Maxpreps.com.

A pretty impressive resume for a talented swingman who doesn’t shy away from the notion that he’s aiming to make a favorable impression upon scouts — much sooner than later.

“I’m a solid shooter who can handle the ball and who is willing to go 110 percent and continue to work hard,” Latham, Jr. said, when asked what he’d like to say to recruiters. “(Basketball) is the love of my life. My whole life has been created to school, serving God, and basketball. I won’t stop now.”

That was quite evident this past season at Marion.



AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Forrest City High’s Timothy Pendleton adjusting nicely to major prep basketball

Pen3FORREST CITY, Arkansas — Timothy Pendleton was asked recently how often does he works out and spends time upgrading his mechanics and fundamentals.

“I work out every day after school and on weekdays,” the Forrest City (Ark.) High freshman athlete said.

Aside from his immense workout and conditioning sessions, it doesn’t take much to get Pendleton to talk about his love for basketball, alone his lofty ambitions for why he plays.

Said Pendleton when asked about to reveal his strengths: “I can get to the basket with ease and finish the shot.”

Said Pendleton when asked to assess his weaknesses: “My biggest weakness is thinking too much when I get the ball.”

Said Pendleton when asked how he will spend his offseason: “I will be in the gym as much as possible working on my skills and playing against tough competition.”

By and large, squaring off against stiff competition is nothing new to the 6-foot, 15-year-old Pendleton who, to his credit, wasted little time making his presence felt.

In quickly finding his niche for the Mustangs, Pendleton provided masterful contributions, particularly from an offensive standpoint.

QUICK LEARNER --- In quickly finding his niche for a Forrest City (Ark.) High squad that finished 136th nationally by Maxpreps.com and is expected to vie for a state crown next season, Timothy Pendleton provided masterful contributions, particularly from an offensive standpoint. He averaged somewhere in the neighborhood of 18 points and grabbed 10 rebounds per game for Forrest City coach Dwight Lofton’s team, and spent a major of his freshman campaign having played multiple positions.

FAST LEARNERIn quickly finding his niche, Timothy Pendleton provided masterful contributions, particularly from an offensive standpoint.
He averaged somewhere in the neighborhood of 18 points and grabbed 10 rebounds per game for Forrest City coach Chris Williams’ team, and spent a major of his freshman campaign having played multiple positions.

He averaged somewhere in the neighborhood of 18 points and grabbed 10 rebounds per game for Forrest City coach Chris Williams’ ninth-grade team, and spent a major of his freshman campaign having played multiple positions.

Truth be told, for a newcomer who appeared destined to make a favorable impression on his coaches and teammates, Pendleton would be the first tell you that his primary focus was to get in where he fit it.

SIBLING LOVE --- Timothy is extremely close to is sister, Tamia Pendleton, who's a student at the University of Arkansas at Conway.

SIBLING LOVETimothy is extremely close to is sister, Tamia Pendleton, who’s a student at the University of Arkansas at Conway.

Fortunately for him, he managed to fit in superbly while preparing to play varsity ball nextseason.

“Timothy has been playing ball ever since he could walk,” said Teisha Lee, Pendleton’s mother. “His grandfather was a ball player and city league coach; his uncles and aunt were also ball players. He couldn’t get away from it. I am a proud mama. I look at basketball as a mean to help further his education so he can get his degree and be a productive, young, black man.”

Interesting enough, attending her son’s game is adventure, of sorts, for Lee.

MOM KNOWS BEST --- “Timothy has been playing ball ever since he could walk,” said Teisha Lee, Pendleton’s mother. “His grandfather was a ball player and city league coach; his uncles and aunt were also ball players. He couldn't get away from it. I am a proud mama. I look at basketball as a mean to help further his education so he can get his degree and be a productive, young, black man.”

MOM KNOWS BEST“Timothy has been playing ball ever since he could walk,” said Teisha Lee, Pendleton’s mother. “His grandfather was a ball player and city league coach; his uncles and aunt were also ball players. He couldn’t get away from it. I am a proud mama. I look at basketball as a mean to help further his education so he can get his degree and be a productive, young, black man.”

“When I watch Timothy play, that proud and loud mother comes out,” Lee explained. “Everyone knows who I am. I am the loudest in the bleachers.”

And in what figures to be a busy offseason on the AAU circuit for Jonesboro’s JB Fireballs, coupled with regular workouts, Pendleton is clinging to hopes that his progress on the court will ring loud and clear before college scouts and recruiters.

“It’s been my dream since I was little (to play college basketball) and I just have a great passion for the game,” said Pendleton, who is scheduled to attend the Future 150 Underclassmen Camp in Antioch, Tennessee in June. “I’d love to do what I love in college.”

If he keeps at this dazzling pace, chances are his long-awaited dream will become a reality.



 

AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

 

 

 

Andrew Bess aiming to boost stock as a projected starter for perennial power Craigmont

drew2Andrew Bess was asked recently to assess his overall display this past season on the Memphis’ tradition-rich basketball circuit.

While the Craigmont High sophomore swingman was pleased with the strides he made for the perennial power Chiefs, he is quick acknowledge that his best and brighter days are well ahead of him.

After all, Bess knows full well that he’s undoubtedly faced with a golden opportunity of making a favorable impression on college scouts and recruiters, in large part because:

HUGE UPGRADE --- After a brief stint for nearly Marion (Arkansas) High, Taylor were among those who never took Andrew Bess’ skills for granted, a discovery that ultimately gave way to the swingman’s family having transferring him roughly 10 miles across the Mississippi bridge to nearby Craigmont. Fortunately for Andrew Bess, it appeared to have been a transition worth making, in large part because Taylor and his staff allowed his the chance to put his mechanic and fundamentals on display for a program that customarily has been one of the area’s finest in recent years.

HUGE UPGRADEAfter a brief stint for nearly Marion (Arkansas) High, Taylor were among those who never took Andrew Bess’ skills for granted, a discovery that ultimately gave way to the swingman’s family having transferring him roughly 10 miles across the Mississippi bridge to nearby Craigmont.
Fortunately for Andrew Bess, it appeared to have been a transition worth making, in large part because Taylor and his staff allowed his the chance to put his mechanic and fundamentals on display for a program that customarily has been one of the area’s finest in recent years.

No. 1: He plays for one Shelby-Metro’s finest and most successful head coaches in Craigmont’s David Taylor and,

No. 2: He still has two full seasons of major varsity basketball ahead on him, meaning if the 6-foot-5 1/2, 159-pounder can continue to be the coacheable, talented kid for which he’s widely known, then the possibility exist that he could find himself signing a much-anticipated National Letter of Intent before his prep career ends, something his mother, Melissa Bess — his grandest supporter — has envisioned for quite some time for her son.

“I don’t have any (letters) from any colleges yet,” Andrew Bess told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson during a recent interview.

Because he is expected to be amongst Craigmont’s key contributors next season, that could all change if Andrew Bess proves he’s as good as advertised.

To his credit, he will certainly be afforded the opportunity to demonstrate that he boasts the skills and poise to handle major high school basketball.

For starters, after a brief stint for nearly Marion (Arkansas) High, Taylor were among those who never took Andrew Bess’ skills for granted, a discovery that ultimately gave way to the swingman’s family having transferred him roughly 10 miles across the Mississippi bridge to nearby Craigmont.

Fortunately for Andrew Bess, it appeared to have been a transition worth making, in large part because Taylor and his staff allowed him the chance to put his mechanic and fundamentals on display for a program that customarily has been one of the area’s finest in recent years.

Craigmont ended the 2015-16 season with a 22-10 mark, capped by a No. 45 overall ranking in Tennessee, according to a season-ending poll released by Maxpreps.com.

In helping the Chiefs enjoy a winning campaign, Andrew Bess didn’t witness varsity action until the latter stages of the season, or during a time when players — most notably underclassmen — show could very well be a sign of things to come.

PITCHING IN --- Craigmont ended the 2015-16 season with a 22-10 mark, capped by a No. 45 overall ranking in Tennessee, according to a season-ending poll released by Maxpreps.com. In helping the Chiefs enjoy a winning campaign, Andrew Bess didn’t witness varsity action until the latter stages of the season, or during a time when players --- most notably underclassmen --- show could very well be a sign of things to come.

PITCHING INCraigmont ended the 2015-16 season with a 22-10 mark, capped by a No. 45 overall ranking in Tennessee, according to a season-ending poll released by Maxpreps.com.
In helping the Chiefs enjoy a winning campaign, Andrew Bess didn’t witness varsity action until the latter stages of the season, or during a time when players — most notably underclassmen — show could very well be a sign of things to come.

That’s exactly what Andrew Bess had done and, to his credit, his contributions have caused Taylor to serious consider installing him in the starting rotation next season.

What a difference a change in scenery has made.

“My biggest strength is height, and my ability to get rebounds,” Andrew Bess said. “My weaknesses are that I can’t handle the ball as well as I should and that I don’t have the best of jump shots.”

He plans to fine-tuned those mechanics this summer while putting his skills on display on the always-competitive Mid-South-area AAU circuit.

Looking ahead, Andrew Bess reiterated that his primary focuses are to do whatever is necessary to help Craigmont remain relevant program and to lure the attention of scouts and recruiters.

“I would like the recruiters to know that I have a high motor and that I have the potential to become a great athlete,” Andrew Bess said. “I do push-ups every other day and I run and play basketball around the neighborhood.”

Effective trends he hopes would ultimately give way to his landing a free education in the coming years.



 

AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Memphian Nik Jackson’s JBAKARI Clothing spreading the good news, providing swag

One thing about Nik Jackson, he’s surely one who stays true to who he is.

Take, for instance, how the 41-year-old Jackson had gone to great lengths to pursuing a career as a professional truck driver.

jak2Nine years after earning his diploma from Memphis Trezevant High, Jackson enrolled at Tennessee Technology trade school, where he had taken the required courses necessary to landing employment in his selected field.

To his credit, he passed in flying colors, which ultimately gave way to a compelling truck-driving a career that is comprised of job stability and security.

Still, he didn’t stop there.

A TRUE TALENT --- Just like possessing a job to drive trucks, he’s making his presence felt in his latest ambition, a trend that appears to have drawn rave reviews from his grandest of supporters, far and near. Memphis-based business owner Nik Jackson is owner and chief executive officer of JBAKARI Clothing Company, a rising, trendy-savvy, stylish apparel establishment that, in Jackson’s own word, was built “on the word of God inspires you through cotton.”

A TRUE TALENTJust like possessing a job to drive trucks, he’s making his presence felt in his latest ambition, a trend that appears to have drawn rave reviews from his grandest of supporters, far and near.
Memphis-based business owner Nik Jackson is owner and chief executive officer of JBAKARI Clothing Company, a rising, trendy-savvy, stylish apparel establishment that, in Jackson’s own word, was built “on the word of God inspires you through cotton.”

Aside from traveling throughout the country for his employer, Jackson clung to yet another lofty endeavor for which he wanted to pursue.

Just like possessing a job to drive trucks, he’s making his presence felt in his latest ambition, a trend that appears to have drawn rave reviews from his grandest of supporters, far and near.

Jackson is owner and chief executive officer of JBAKARI Clothing Company, a rising, trendy-savvy, stylish apparel establishment that, in Jackson’s own word, was built “on the word of God inspires you through cotton.”

“It gives each piece a sense of royalty,” Jackson said during a recent interview with longtime journalist Andre Johnson.

yuThat proverbial “royalty” spark isn’t all JBAKARI Clothing offers consumers, particularly as it pertains to the life-enhancing, compassionate message and mission for which Jackson’s clothing line was established.

JBAKARI Clothing also offers what Jackson describes as pictorial scripture designs that uplifts motivates, encourages, and keeps customers entertained through humor.

jak8In a nutshell, as far as Jackson is concerned, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with spreading the gospel and lifting up Christ with a catchy, comic message applied to it because, regardless of the message, nothing supersedes or surpasses the word of God.

jak“The competitive drive in sports propelled me in my business venture by being focused on one goal at a time,” Jackson, a former “street and backyard basketball” player, said of his reasoning and mission behind his business. “Working hard and making faith moves toward a desired result is what I like most about my business. It is the creativity of the designs and how they bless people when they see them and wear them (is what’s so appealing).”

ON A MISSION --- Nine years after earning his diploma from Memphis Trezevant High, Jackson enrolled at Tennessee Technology trade school, where he had taken the required courses necessary to landing employment in his selected field. To his credit, he passed in flying colors, which ultimately gave way to a compelling truck-driving a career that is comprised of job stability and security. Still, he didn’t stop there.

ON A MISSIONNine years after earning his diploma from Memphis Trezevant High, Jackson enrolled at Tennessee Technology trade school, where he had taken the required courses necessary to landing employment in his selected field.
To his credit, he passed in flying colors, which ultimately gave way to a compelling truck-driving a career that is comprised of job stability and security.
Still, he didn’t stop there.

A compelling, attracting product that resembles that of Polo Sport and Tommy Hilfiger, JBAKARI clothing caters to all races, nationalities, and various cultures of people.

By and large, Jackson said starting his clothing line was inspired largely through the entrepreneurial success of Sean P. Diddy Combs and Ralph Lauren.

Don’t blink now.

SHOP JBAKARI Clothing ONLINE:  jbakariclothing.deco-apparel.com

JBAKARI Clothing is not only steadily evolving as a fashion statement and progressive trend for all, but this rising clothing is making a strong case that it could very well be around for some time.

weAfter all, that’s exactly how Jackson has envisioned it from the outset.

“My personal mission for doing this work is to win souls into the kingdom of heaven,” Jackson explained. “I have been doing this since 2001. I think that it is imperative that I esteem others daily because people need hope and they need to know that Jesus loves them.”

Which, to Jackson’s credit, is why JBAKARI Clothing makes all of the sense in the world.

As he tells it, there’s nothing bad about lifting up Jesus and dressing cool — and with swag — in the process.

Said Jackson: “JBAKARI stands for going forward: Jesus brings-About Kindness And Right Insight. Going backwards: I Receives All Knowledge About Beautiful Jesus.”

Yep. That’s quite typical of Jackson, a rising clothing designer, let alone one who stays true to who he is.

That is a child of the Most High God.



AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Memphian Christie Henry having a Texas-size impact as a flourishing singer and model

DALLAS — Say what you want about Christie Henry.

But when to comes to chasing dreams and ensuring that they become a reality, no one has to give her some long, exhausting motivational speech.

4Ever since her youth, particularly when she had become of age to grasp a thorough understanding of what it means to maximize her potential, Henry steadfastly adopted a persona that suggests, among other things, that falling short of fulfilling her goals and ambitions weren’t option.

If nothing else, because of her devout faith, coupled with the resiliency for which she was taught, Henry’s reputation is such that she customarily aspires to see from beyond where she is.

In a nutshell, she’s one who doesn’t settle.

Rather, she’s one who goes to great lengths to make things happen.

“I thought I was one step closer to pursuing my dream,” Henry said during an interview Friday afternoon with longtime journalist Andre Johnson. “But God has a great way of revealing your true purpose.”

MEMPHIS MADE --- Ever since her youth in growing up in Memphis, particularly when she had become of age to grasp a thorough understanding of what it means to maximize her potential, Dallas-based model and singer Christie Henry steadfastly adopted a persona that suggests, among other things, that falling short of fulfilling her goals and ambitions weren’t option.

MEMPHIS MADEEver since her youth in growing up in Memphis, particularly when she had become of age to grasp a thorough understanding of what it means to maximize her potential, Dallas-based model and singer Christie Henry steadfastly adopted a persona that suggests, among other things, that falling short of fulfilling her goals and ambitions weren’t option.

A Memphis native and graduate of Fairley High, the 25-year-old Henry is alluding largely to the events and circumstances surrounding her recent relocation to the Dallas Fort-Worth area.

Upon graduating high school in the top 10 percent of her class, Henry enrolled at nearby University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, where she studied Mass Communications and was a member of the school’s internationally-acclaimed marching band known as The Marching Musical Machines Of The Mid-South. In addition, she joined the college’s modeling club, gospel choir, and student council.

That’s when change ultimately took place. An assortment of changes, that is.

“After a heart-to-heart convo with my mentor, I decided to transfer to The University of Memphis to pursue a degree in Music and film,” Henry explained.
Still, her tenure at the U of M was short-lived, considering it had become increasingly evident that if Henry aspired to become more effective in her element, a move away from her native hometown was essential.

CHASING GREATNESS --- Upon graduating high school in the top 10 percent of her class, Henry enrolled at nearby University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, where she studied Mass Communications and was a member of the school’s internationally-acclaimed marching band known as The Marching Musical Machines Of The Mid-South. In addition, she joined the college’s modeling club, gospel choir, and student council.

CHASING GREATNESSUpon graduating high school in the top 10 percent of her class, Henry enrolled at nearby University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, where she studied Mass Communications and was a member of the school’s internationally-acclaimed marching band known as The Marching Musical Machines Of The Mid-South. In addition, she joined the college’s modeling club, gospel choir, and student council.

On to Dallas, Texas she went.

Given the immense strides she’s made in such a brief time in the Lone Star state, it’s safe to assume that her unlikely relocation was a risk worth taking.

“After some serious prayer, I decided to pack my bags and leave for Texas to pursue my music career full time and attend a music or fine arts institution to better my craft,” Henry said.

CHECK OUT CHRISTIE HENRY IN ACTION: https://youtu.be/j379iIs5MxE

Fortunately for this rising model and avid singer, Texas undoubtedly appears to be the ideal establishment. Since her arrival here, Henry has been afforded an assortment of opportunities to broaden her horizon, considering she has become a fixture and featured singing guest at the Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge during its Live Jazz Sunday Brunch.

Located in Carrollton, Texas, Henry customarily performs during Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge’s brunch times, which usually is between 1 and 3:30 pm.

TEXAS-SIZE IMPACT --- Given the immense strides she’s made in such a brief time in the Lone Star state, it’s safe to assume that her unlikely relocation was a risk worth taking. “After some serious prayer, I decided to pack my bags and leave for Texas to pursue my music career full time and attend a music or fine arts institution to better my craft,” Henry said.

TEXAS-SIZE IMPACTGiven the immense strides she’s made in such a brief time in the Lone Star state, it’s safe to assume that her unlikely relocation was a risk worth taking.
“After some serious prayer, I decided to pack my bags and leave for Texas to pursue my music career full time and attend a music or fine arts institution to better my craft,” Henry said.

A singer for the past two decades, Henry had gained a fond admiration for music, given she had become a fixture for entering talent shows and talent expos as a way to generate exposure and demonstrate to her listening audience that she could soar to immense heights in this ever-so-popular industry.

“Now I’m here in Dallas, making my dreams come true with my Father in Heaven by my side,” Henry said with a smile.

To her credit, she has every reason to display her signature, attractive smile that, along with her mesmerizing vocals, has enabled her to become one with lofty modeling aspirations.

“I love the fact that I can be myself throughout this journey that God has destined me to be on,” Henry explained. “I also love the fact that I am able to give back by helping others with their music programs at their church and learning centers here in Dallas, and encouraging others to go after their dreams as well.”

Looking back, it is because of the past struggles through which her mother, Andrea Henry-Houston, and other loved ones had weathered that greatly helped shaped Henry into the progressive, flourishing woman of color for which she is widely known.

RISING STAR --- Henry has been afforded an assortment of opportunities to broaden her horizon, considering she has become a fixture and featured singing guest at the Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge during its Live Jazz Sunday Brunch. Located in Carrolton, Texas, Henry customarily performs during Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge’s brunch times, which usually is between 1 and 3:30 pm.

RISING STARHenry has been afforded an assortment of opportunities to broaden her horizon, considering she has become a fixture and featured singing guest at the Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge during its Live Jazz Sunday Brunch.
Located in Carrolton, Texas, Henry customarily performs during Hoops Restaurant Bar & Lounge’s brunch times, which usually is between 1 and 3:30 pm.

In both Tennessee and Texas.

“My mother Andrea Henry-Houston, my grandmother Catherine Henry, and cousin Dedra Thomas…these women showed me what hard work and perseverance can do,” Christie Henry said. They were all single mothers in the struggle who were trying to make a better life for me. Every band competition, talent show, etc., they were there along with other family members. With all that is going on in our family, from struggles, deaths, financial issues, and more, they continued to press through and make it happen for our family.”

10As for the critics and naysayers, Christie Henry said, “I would have to hear people say, ‘You’re not going to be serious about being an artist’ or they get upset when I share my life dreams. But I could always count on my mom to intervene and just say, ‘You can do or be whatever as long as God is first in your life and you put the work behind it.’”

The rest, as they say, it history.

Roughly a few months removed from having bolted Memphis for a city that’s nearly three times the size of her native hometown, Christie Henry hasn’t shown any signs of a letdown, much less shown any signs that she’s planning to slow it down anytime soon.

No. No time soon.

Not with so much success at stake.

Say what you want about her.

But Christie Henry is doing it big in the state where doing things big is a part of the norm.

How ‘bout that.

“In all that you do, you’ve got to put God first, in the middle, and at the end of it,” Christie Henry said. “You can never go wrong when He’s involved.”

She would know.

Because when to comes to chasing dreams and ensuring that they become a reality, no one has to give her some long, exhausting motivational speech.



AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an honor student, entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.