Former Memphis-area educator Rekeshia Hudson takes brave leap of faith into entrepreneurship

“The LORD shall open unto thee his good treasure, the heaven to give the rain unto thy land in his season, and to bless all the work of thine hand: and thou shalt lend unto many nations, and thou shalt not borrow.” (Deuteronomy 28:12)

 

hhhhJust days ago, Rekeshia Hudson was asked to assess why the above Biblical passage undoubtedly is her favorite.

As usual, she wasted little time paying homage to her Creator.

“This passage impacts my life daily, because it is a promise from the Lord,” Hudson told longtime journalist Andre Johnson during a recent interview. “He keeps His promises.”

From the time she recalled like yesterday when she roamed the campus of tradition-rich Memphis Whitehaven High, to when she worked earnestly toward pursuing her undergraduate degree in Psychology from the University of Memphis, to when she steadfastly persevered until she possessed her much-anticipated Master’s of Education degree from nearby Freed Hardeman University, Hudson can dauntlessly attest that God has kept His promises.

In fact, given the immense strides she’s made over the years, it’s safe to assume that God not only delivered on His emphatic, life-changing pledges but, for Hudson, He’s shown her daily the calling about which He’s intentionally given her.

Now, unlike never before, it’s safe to assume that she’s not only basking in the glory and splendor of these promises but, above all, she’s walking diligently in her divine purpose.

“I have a heart for children,” Hudson explained. “I have a love for helping. I believe I can change the world, one child at a time.”

To her credit, she’s doing just that — with God, her Helper, leading the way.

AMAZING GRACE AND FAVOR --- A native Memphian and a married mother of two adorable daughters (Chance Imani and Rylee Grace), Rekeshia Hudson is a former Memphis-area educator and a current Mid-South area business owner. A notable education tenure in which she served Pre-Kindergarten through fifth grade students, as well as assumed the role as an elementary school counselor in what she describes as an “urban setting,” Hudson has appropriately shifted her focus to entrepreneurialship. As she tells it, such a lofty transition, by all accounts, was a colossal leap of faith, one about which she’s thoroughly convinced was orchestrated by Almighty God from the outset.

AMAZING GRACE AND FAVORA native Memphian and a married mother of two adorable daughters (Chance Imani and Rylee Grace), Rekeshia Hudson is a former Memphis-area educator and a current Mid-South area business owner.
A notable education tenure in which she served Pre-Kindergarten through fifth grade students, as well as assumed the role as an elementary school counselor in what she describes as an “urban setting,” Hudson has appropriately shifted her focus to entrepreneurialship.
As she tells it, such a lofty transition, by all accounts, was a colossal leap of faith, one about which she’s thoroughly convinced was orchestrated by Almighty God from the outset.

A native Memphian and a married mother of two adorable daughters (Chance Imani and Rylee Grace), Hudson is a former Memphis-area educator and a current Mid-South area business owner.

A notable education tenure in which she served Pre-Kindergarten through fifth grade students, as well as assumed the role as an elementary school counselor in what she describes as an “urban setting,” Hudson has appropriately shifted her focus to entrepreneurship.

As she tells it, such a lofty transition, by all accounts, was a colossal leap of faith, one about which she’s thoroughly convinced was orchestrated by Almighty God from the outset.

Never mind that she’s relatively new to all of this.

After all, with God, all things are possible because, if Hudson said it once, she’s said it countless times.

He keeps His promises.

“God is awesome and I am excited about the possibilities of what is to come,” said Hudson, explaining the significance of why she had to obey the voice of God and change careers. “I am thankful that I can take my daughter back and forth to school without stressing to get to work on two wheels. I am thankful that I can volunteer at my daughter’s school. I am blessed to wake up in the morning excited about going to do what I absolutely love, helping middle income families plan their finances. I am glad I jumped.”

Fortunately for Hudson, she had arguably her grandest cheerleader, who pushed her to jump, thus take that long-awaited leap of faith both in the natural and spirit.

“My husband is that calming voice that reminds me that all is well,” said Hudson, acknowledging Cleothues Hudson, Jr., her high school sweetheart and husband of nine years. “He allows me to pour out of my soul what I envision. He is extremely supportive in business and in our personal life. He is very hands-on and very vocal.”

Not to mention arguably the best coworkers with whom she’s ever crossed paths.

“His partnership is further confirmation from God that it was more than permissible to leap and change our lives so that we can be free from a boss, love God more through the ministry of generosity, spend time with our girls, date one another and help other families to achieve their financial goals,” Rekeshia Hudson said. “My husband keeps me focused. I am grateful for my forever friend.”

LOVE BIRDS --- Fortunately for Hudson, she had arguably her grandest cheerleader, who pushed her to jump, thus take that long-awaited leap of faith both in the natural and spirit. “My husband is that calming voice that reminds me that all is well,” said Hudson, acknowledging Cleothues Hudson, Jr., her husband of nine years. “He allows me to pour out of my soul what I envision. He is extremely supportive in business and in our personal life. He is very hands-on and very vocal.”

LOVE BIRDSFortunately for Hudson, she had arguably her grandest cheerleader, who pushed her to jump, thus take that long-awaited leap of faith both in the natural and spirit.
“My husband is that calming voice that reminds me that all is well,” said Hudson, acknowledging Cleothues Hudson, Jr., her husband of nine years. “He allows me to pour out of my soul what I envision. He is extremely supportive in business and in our personal life. He is very hands-on and very vocal.”

A little more than seven years removed from having suffered consecutive miscarriages — in October 2008 and April 2009 — for the Hudsons, it’s evident that God has surely allowed His countenance to shine upon them.

“We quickly learned how precious life is,” Rekeshia Hudson said of losing two sons to miscarriages. “This experience taught us the importance of togetherness. We have conquered many battles and entrepreneurship is definitely squeezing the potential from my husband and me.”

Now it’s on to bigger and better things, on to creating more lasting memories that, come to think of it, were apart of God’s plans all along.

Besides, if Rekeshia Hudson said it once, she’s said it countless time.

He keeps His promises.

“We realize if we can dream it, we can do it,” she said. “If we can think it, we can bring it to past. We are on another level with our thinking and with Christ, there is nothing impossible.”

As usual, she wasted little time paying homage to her Creator.



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Health-Tech Institute of Memphis becoming a fixture in Bluff City, surrounding areas

AAAAAJust recently, Ronald Kendall Washington was asked to summarize the longstanding mission for his flourishing organization, the Health-Tech Institute of Memphis.

He appropriately fielded the question as if he expected it.

“HTIM’s mission statement is, ‘Learn It! Know It! Apply It!’ Washington told long time journalist Andre Johnson.

To his credit, coupled with the dedicatory service and favorable contributions of his staff, this is, by all accounts, amongst the grandest reasons Washington’s organization has become the educational beacon of light, of sorts, for which it is widely known.

“This motto states exactly how we treat and the expected outcomes we have for our students,” Washington explained. “From the initial interview, to graduation, and any post graduate contact we have with our students, we design a training plan for them to achieve their goals in their chosen field.  It is imperative that they understand that day one.”

WWWWThe longtime owner and chief executive officer of Health-Tech Institute of Memphis along with his wife, Melanie, who’s the institution’s president and brings to HTIM well over two decades of experience in the education sector, HTIM for some time has been a fixture in the Memphis-metropolitan area.

Located at 571 Vance Avenue in the heart of South Memphis, HTIM is a post-secondary educational institution by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and is approved for Veterans Training by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

According to the organization’s website (http://www.htimphs.com/), HTIM routinely offers certifications in Certified Medical Assisting, Health-Information Management (or Medical Billing and Coding), Office Administration,  Patient Care Technician, and National Craft Assessment (NCCER).

“HTIM (also) provides training in the fields of Allied Health and Business Services,” Ronald Washington acknowledged.

That’s because Allied Health and Business Services both are demand occupation sectors in the United States, in large part because they have been identified by the local greater Memphis Labor Analysis Data as well for the area.

CHECK OUT HTIM ONLINE: http://www.htimphs.com/.

That, as a result, figures to benefit the Bluff City and surrounding areas for years to come.

In a nutshell, HTIM is just what Memphis needs and, because its staff is one that is well-experienced and has made education an integral force surrounding his mission, it’s safe to assume this organization’s best and brightest days are well ahead of it.

According to a spokesperson for HTIM, this post-secondary educational institution has been training individuals since November 1999.

MAKING STRIDES --- Located at 571 Vance Avenue in the heart of South Memphis, HTIM is a post-secondary educational institution by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and is approved for Veterans Training by the Department of Veterans Affairs. According to the organization’s website (http://www.htimphs.com/), HTIM routinely offers certifications in Certified Medical Assisting, Health-Information Management (or Medical Billing and Coding), Office Administration, Patient Care Technician, and National Craft Assessment (NCCER).

MAKING STRIDESLocated at 571 Vance Avenue in the heart of South Memphis, HTIM is a post-secondary educational institution by the Tennessee Higher Education Commission and is approved for Veterans Training by the Department of Veterans Affairs.
According to the organization’s website (http://www.htimphs.com/), HTIM routinely offers certifications in Certified Medical Assisting, Health-Information Management (or Medical Billing and Coding), Office Administration, Patient Care Technician, and National Craft Assessment (NCCER).

Add to the fact that countless students have earned diplomas and professional/technical certifications in their chosen fields since HTIM’s inception, and it’s no wonder that even the mainstream media is starting to take in account just how vital a credible institution such as HTIM is in greater Memphis.

“As part of our projected growth to serve more potential students with our training services, HTIM applied and completed the initial process for accreditation with the Council on Occupational Education,” Ronald Washington said.

LOOKING AHEAD --- “HTIM’s expectation for growth is to add two additional locations in Memphis and spread to the Nashville area with additional schools before doing the same in the eastern parts of Tennessee,” Washington said. “Our goal is to have 5,000 students by the 2022 in the state of Tennessee.”

LOOKING AHEAD“HTIM’s expectation for growth is to add two additional locations in Memphis and spread to the Nashville area with additional schools before doing the same in the eastern parts of Tennessee,” Washington said. “Our goal is to have 5,000 students by the 2022 in the state of Tennessee.”

According to Washington, Council on Occupational Education — or COE — is a leading accreditor of institutions seeking eligibility for federal Department of Education Title IV participation, or Pell Grants, Stafford Loans, etc.  Moreover, COE has scheduled the “full” Accreditation Visit for April 17, 2017 and, as Washington acknowledged, such a sequence will greatly advance the number of students, particularly as it relates to enrolling and training at his institution.

Not only that, because of its well-experienced staff that includes Jennyfer Washington, HTIM’s Director of Admissions, as well as stellar advisory board, chances are the State of Tennessee in all likelihood will start to become more enlightened about this flourishing institution.

Much sooner than later.

“HTIM’s expectation for growth is to add two additional locations in Memphis and spread to the Nashville area with additional schools before doing the same in the eastern parts of Tennessee,” Washington said.  “Our goal is to have 5,000 students by the 2022 in the state of Tennessee.”

All of whom will be expected to live up to and fortify the longstanding, flagship mission:

“Learn It! Know It! Apply It!”

 

HEALTH-TECH INSTITUTE OF MEMPHIS’ ADMINISTRATION & FACULTY

Melanie K. Washington, President

Melanie Washington is the owner & President of HTIM. She is a retired Memphis City Schools teacher of 20 years who has devoted her life to education.

Melanie has a Bachelor of Science in Education from Lemoyne-Owen College & a Masters of Education from Cumberland University.

Ronald K. Washington, Dean of Business Affairs

Ron serves as the Dean of Business Affairs. Before joining HTIM, he was a Program Specialist with the Private Industry Council specializing in designing employment and training programs for dislocated workers.  Ron holds several certifications in business and allied health services which gives him insight on how to design each training program curriculum offered by HTIM. 

Veronyca Washington, Vice President of Academic Affairs

Veronyca joined HTIM in 2008 as an Executive Administrative Assistant to the President & was promoted to Vice President of Academic Affairs in 2011.

Veronyca has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from Fisk University & a Master of Science in Public Health from Meharry Medical College.

Jennyfer Washington, Director of Admissions & Financial Aid

Jennyfer serves as Director of Admissions & Financial Aid & has been with HTIM for 7 years. In her role, she is responsible for student admission & retention.

Jennyfer has a Bachelor of Science in Sociology/Education/Health from Middle Tennessee State University.

Michelle Cotton, Health Information Management Professor

Rachel Lester, Medical Assistant Clinical Professor

Melissa Garrett, Pharmacy Technician Professor

 

OUR ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Institutional Advisory Board Members

Patricia Sonyika, MD, Board Anesthesiologist Chair

Mariah H. Mardis, MD, Associate Director; OccuMed; Vice-Chair

Program Committee Board Members

Betty Rodgers, RN, Chief Operating Officer, Pulse First 1      

Carlotta Hill, BS, Medical Support Administrator, Union Avenue  Dental   

Jacqueline Williams, CCAT, CPAT, Billing & Collections Specialist, Methodist Healthcare Systems

Michelle Cotton, CCA, Lead Inpatient Coder, Parkwood Behavioral Systems  

Doris Brown, CCAT, Reimbursement Specialist, The West Clinic      

Victor Anderson, MBA, Chief Fiscal Officer, Memphis Overton Park Zoo

 

For more information about the Health-Tech Institute of Memphis, call 901-529-9007.  

                                                                                                  



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Houston area salon owner Aidah Sama following in massive footsteps of her grandmother

DALLAS — Aidah Sama is pretty easy on the eyes.

However, she’d be the first to tell you that she wants to be more than just a pretty face.

qqqq 1996 graduate of Denver, Colorado’s East High School, Sama recalls like yesterday how an expected termination from her job essentially changed the overall landscape of her young life.

“Right after high school, I was fired from my job at a call center simply because I was on track to being promoted,” Sama told longtime journalist Andre Johnson during an exclusive interview on Friday. “Those types of jobs do mass firings or layoffs to prevent themselves from paying more when they can simply hire new people at starting salaries and keep their profit margins higher.”

TERRIFIC TEXAS TURNAROUND --- Aidah Sama, 38, is owner and chief executive officer of Aidah Sama Bridal Stylist And Colorist in the Woodlands, Texas, which is a few miles north of the city of Houston. An up-and-coming business in which her solid is clientele has undergone favorable changes in recent years, Sama attributes much of her career success to the fact that she’s had the luxury of residing in several major cities over the past decades, a trend that greatly allowed her to become knowledgeable of the pros and cons as a salon owner.

TERRIFIC TEXAS TURNAROUNDAidah Sama, 38, is owner and chief executive officer of Aidah Sama Bridal Stylist And Colorist in the Woodlands, Texas, which is a few miles north of the city of Houston. An up-and-coming business in which her solid is clientele has undergone favorable changes in recent years, Sama attributes much of her career success to the fact that she’s had the luxury of residing in several major cities over the past decades, a trend that greatly allowed her to become knowledgeable of the pros and cons as a salon owner.

Fortunately for Sama, a native of Denver who currently resides in the Houston, Texas area, her untimely firing essentially served as a blessing in disguise, thus greatly fueled her desire to mightily embark upon a career for which God has rightly purposed her.

Today, unlike never before, she’s undoubtedly basking in the glory of a notable cosmetologist career that, to her credit, has greatly given her an entirely different disposition on life.

Moreover, as Sama tells it, such a spirited turn of events surfaced courtesy of what turned out to be a memorable bus ride.

“I hated the feeling of someone being able to hold

your lively hood in their hands,” said Sama, alluding to her unannounced firing from a job that offered virtually little opportunities for growth. “So on the way home, I decided I wanted to do something I loved that would provide for me and family and I would have full control and that no one would fire me again. So I hopped on the bus and went to cosmetology school.”

Years removed from a firing that essentially has benefited her mightily, Sama was destined to climb the career ladder in her selected field of interest.

Boy, did she ever.

So much so that today, Sama, 38, is owner and chief executive officer of Aidah Sama Bridal Stylist And Colorist in the Woodlands, Texas, which is a few miles north of the city of Houston.

FOLLOW AIDAH SAMA ON SOCIAL MEDIA: https://www.facebook.com/AidahSamaBridesandColor/.

An up-and-coming business in which her solid is clientele has undergone favorable changes in recent years, Sama attributes much of her career success to the fact that she’s had the luxury of residing in several major cities over the past decades, a trend that greatly allowed her to become knowledgeable of the pros and cons as a salon owner.

Given the immense success she’s enjoyed in recent years, it’s safe to assume that past call center firing isn’t just a distant memory but, most importantly, it proved to be just the setback Sama needed to encounter that jumpstarted her miraculously comeback.

aaaaShe’s baaaaaack.

“I love the fact that this business is constantly changing,” Sama said. “Nothing stays the same. Every five years or so, I have reinvented myself. I have had the opportunity to live in four cities over the last 10 years being able to adapt to my surroundings and build my clientele over and

over helped me truly understand the blessing is with me and in my hands.

A TRUE TALENT --- As owner of a rising business that is starting to become a fixture in the Houston metropolitan area, Sama specializes in an assortment of special occasions, most notably weddings, proms, homecoming courts, even Black Tie Galas as well as a variety of hair colorings.

A TRUE TALENTAs owner of a rising business that is starting to become a fixture in the Houston metropolitan area, Sama specializes in an assortment of special occasions, most notably weddings, proms, homecoming courts, even Black Tie Galas as well as a variety of hair colorings.

“I have learned it’s not about being considered high end simply because you work in one of those expensive salons,” Sama continued. “It’s about how much you value what you offer and building your brand as such. I started out doing hair at $18 for a shampoo and blow dry. After one year, I doubled my prices. I was worth more and my work spoke for itself.”

CONTACT AIDAH: aidahsama@gmail.com.

More than anything, Sama is highly appreciative of her grandmother, a longtime professional salon owner who was arguably her biggest mentor.

Sama’s grandmother opened her first salon months after Sama was born. Upon graduating from cosmetology school, Sama assumed a position at her establishment, where she was afforded a front row seat, or sorts, as it pertains to learning to operate and manage a salon.

Thank God for grandma.

vvvv“Momma, as I love to call her, doesn’t play,” Sama said. “She ran a very tight ship, where professionalism is a non-negotiable. She groomed me into the business person I am today. I get my no-nonsense attitude and business savvyness from her. She will lovingly

tell you, ‘You shouldn’t have named her after me if you didn’t want her to act like me.’ In this business you have to have tough skin and keep the overall goal in perspective at all

times.”

aaaaaaAs owner of a rising business that is starting to become a fixture in the Houston metropolitan area, Sama specializes in an assortment of special occasions, most notably weddings, proms, homecoming courts, even Black Tie Galas as well as a variety of hair colorings.

rrrrBy and large, it is because her family boasts a stellar list of professional cosmetologists that God had divinely purposed Sama to fulfill and live out her dream.

Ahhhhh…just as she had envisioned in the aftermath of that abrupt call center firing.

mmmm“Cosmetology and entrepreneurship have been in my family for generations,” Sama said. “My grandmother open her first salon the year I was born. I have just continued to hold the mantle passed on to me. I have over the course of my career gone into other salons to work since moving around while married was required, but I always ended up right back in an ownership leadership role. I am a natural leader.”

Which, to her credit, isn’t bad after all, especially for someone who’s pretty easy on the eyes.

 

For more information about Aidah Sama Bridal Stylist And Colorist, call (281) 419-7262.

 



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Professional massage therapist and dance choreographer Keith Clark thriving in Dallas/Fort Worth area

DALLAS — Keith Clark II was asked earlier this week to recall his past history as an athlete.

After pausing momentarily, the usual outspoken, yet modest Clark responded with the proverbial “Laughing Out Loud.”

TEXAS SIZE IMPACT --- Currently a resident of the Dallas/Fort Worth area, Gary, Indiana native Keith Clark II is a professional Dancer/Instructor/Choreographer as well a Licensed Massage Therapist for a business venture he has deemed Revivify Massage Therapy. By and large, the 41-year-old Clark oversees a business called Keith Clark Collection (or KCC), which is an all natural line of skin care and aromatherapy “goodies” to assist in healing one's mind, body and emotions.

TEXAS SIZE IMPACTCurrently a resident of the Dallas/Fort Worth area, Gary, Indiana native Keith Clark II is a professional Dancer/Instructor/Choreographer as well a Licensed Massage Therapist for a business venture he has deemed Revivify Massage Therapy. By and large, the 41-year-old Clark oversees a business called Keith Clark Collection (or KCC), which is an all natural line of skin care and aromatherapy “goodies” to assist in healing one’s mind, body and emotions. (Photo by B. Ellis Photography) 

“I (participated in) track (and field) on and off, then made the decision to dance,” Clark told longtime journalist during an exclusive interview “(LOL)…I didn’t complete one full season in track. (SMH)….”

While Clark’s past athletic tenure was rather short-lived, the Gary, Indiana native’s disposition was such that he steadfastly devised ways to broaden his horizon, embraced new challenges, thus took advantage of golden opportunities to excel.

In a nutshell, he’s widely known amongst his peers as one who customarily goes above and beyond to not just create a carefree lifestyle for himself but, most importantly, for those with whom he frequently crosses paths.

That, after all, practically sums up why Clark has delved off into the world of entrepreneurialship.

Currently a resident of the Dallas/Fort Worth area, Clark is a professional Dancer/Instructor/Choreographer as well a Licensed Massage Therapist for a business venture he has deemed Revivify Massage Therapy.

mmmmBy and large, the 41-year-old Clark oversees a business called Keith Clark Collection (or KCC), which is an all natural line of skin care and aromatherapy “goodies” to assist in healing one’s mind, body and emotions.

“The reason I chose track is because it is a very individualized sport, where even though you are a team, ultimately your race is on your race,” said Clark, explaining the correlation between the competitive drive of sports and starting a business. “That same dedication, focus, individualism, grit, sweat and determination are needed when you decide to become an entrepreneur and/or step out on your own to start a business.”

Follow Keith on Social Media: Revivify on Facebook/renewrestorerecharge
Website: www.revivify.massagetherapy.com.
Follow KCC on Facebook & Instagram: @keithclarkcollection
Website: www.k2c.bigcartel.com.

If nothing else, Clark undoubtedly possesses the skills and durability, particularly as it pertains to running the business ventures about which he oversees.

aaaFor starters, he’s been diligently involved in dancing, teaching, choreographing for more than three decades and has become an efficient masseuse for the past 18 years (but has been officially licensed for six years.

“When I decided to leave the corporate world,” said Clark, a Purdue University graduate, “KCC about five years old…three years of trial and era and research, but actively selling for years.”

Moreover, Clark would be the first to admit that being a longtime massage therapist has its distinct advantages, of sorts.

yyy“Being a massage therapist, I see firsthand a lot of clients that are medicated and, believe it or not, a lot of these synthetic medications actually hinder the body from naturally healing itself,” Clark explained. “This is where KCC comes into play. As I began to research the benefits of aromatherapy via essential oils and natural alternatives to combat skin issues that some of my clients had, such as eczema, psoriasis, acne, and warts. Or emotional issues such as anxiety, depression, grief. And physical issues such as headaches, migraines, digestive, sinus, respiratory and circulation. So I started creating products that had proven results which led to my clients wanting to purchase what assisted in “healing” them. After two years of coaxing, sampling on friends and colleagues, KCC came to be.”

yyyyyyThe rest, as they say, is history.

Not only is it safe to assume that Clark is well-rounded and quite knowledgeable about his products but, to his credit, his business venture is starting to enhance the lives of his clients.

So much for trial and era.

eee“I love the fact that my very active background, from wanting to be a stunt man to running track to dancing has allowed me to get to know the ultimate piece of machinery, (which is) the human body,” Clark said. “This allows me to pin point the mechanical breakdown of a person’s musculature and try to assist clients in maintaining their body to perform daily activities. And for my athletic clients, optimizing their body to compete at higher levels.

zzzzMore than anything, Clark acknowledges, it is because of his unyielding faith that has elevated his business mightily.

“I am a believer in Christ,” Clark said. “When you know whose you are and why you are, your gifts and talents will make room for you. When one realizes their purpose in this life, you can’t help but to be obedient to the calling on your life — loving, sharing, and helping our fellow man/woman are imperative.”

Spoken like a true, progressive businessman.



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Chisa Anderson’s 901 Strands enjoying continuous success since its inception

Chisa Anderson didn’t waste any time.

Months after graduating from Memphis Trezevant High School in 1998, Anderson consequently took her cosmetology talents straight to nearby New Wave Hair Academy.

CHASING GREATNESS --- After a little more than a decade-and-a-half, Chisa Anderson, 35, has witnessed God enlarge her territory, thus catapult her to a much-anticipated harvest season in the process. A native of Mississippi, Anderson is owner and chief executive officer of 901 Strands Salon & Hair Extensions. Located at 6880 Hillshire Drive, Suite 10 in Memphis, Anderson, to her credit, has appropriately emerged from stewardship in the cosmetology industry to her rightful place as ownership.

CHASING GREATNESSAfter a little more than a decade-and-a-half, Chisa Anderson, 35, has witnessed God enlarge her territory, thus catapult her to a much-anticipated harvest season in the process. A native of Mississippi, Anderson is owner and chief executive officer of 901 Strands Salon & Hair Extensions. Located at 6880 Hillshire Drive, Suite 10 in Memphis, Anderson, to her credit, has appropriately emerged from stewardship in the cosmetology industry to her rightful place as ownership.

Like many of her peers, Anderson had clung to lofty aspirations of not just occupying space in someone else’s salon, helping them live out their dreams, thus relinquishing the customary booth rent time and again.

Rather Anderson’s vision was far greater and bigger than that, regardless of how seemingly insurmountable or challenging it had become.

Make no mistake, Anderson, as far as she was concerned, wasn’t about to settle for just getting by, wasn’t merely about to harbor the play-it-safe mentality in this ever-so-competitive cosmetology industry.

THE FINISHED PRODUCT --- Fortunately for Anderson, who also studied Business and International Business at Southwest Tennessee Community College and Strayer University, respectively, she is finally reaping the benefits of her valiant, resilient efforts as a professional cosmetologist.

THE FINISHED PRODUCTFortunately for Anderson, who also studied Business and International Business at Southwest Tennessee Community College and Strayer University, respectively, she is finally reaping the benefits of her valiant, resilient efforts as a professional cosmetologist.

Because of the life-enhancing vision and divine purpose by which God has blessed her, Anderson has seemingly reached the pinnacle of a career that only keeps gets greater.

All because, well, she didn’t waste any time.

“I went straight to New Wave Hair Academy and completed my hours and received my State Board License in 2000,” Anderson told longtime journalist Andre Johnson during an exclusive interview. “(I’ve had) my license 16 years now.”

Now after a little more than a decade-and-a-half, Anderson, 35, has witnessed God enlarge her territory, thus catapult her to a much-anticipated harvest season in the process.

aaA native of Mississippi, Anderson is owner and chief executive officer of 901 Strands Salon & Hair Extensions.

Located at 6880 Hillshire Drive, Suite 10 in Memphis, Anderson, to her credit, has appropriately emerged from stewardship in the cosmetology industry to her rightful place as ownership.

pppppppTalk about pure perseverance.

Fortunately for Anderson, who also studied Business and International Business at Southwest Tennessee Community College and Strayer University, respectively, she is finally reaping the benefits of her valiant, resilient efforts as a professional cosmetologist.

uuu“I took an international business course and was very intrigued in the foreign market,” Anderson said. Fast forward to years later, and I have a business where I work directly with foreign markets. Go figure.”

She didn’t waste any time.

That’s because along with Anderson’s solid clientele, 901 Strands also offers consumers as assortment of stylish hair extensions.

Pretty clever for a business that recently celebrated its official grand opening in mid-June.

TTTTYYYAs if things aren’t on the up-and-up enough, it’s safe to assume that Anderson’s has lured a solid, experienced staff of professional cosmetologists to help fortify 901 Strands’ mission.

Of her five styling stations, three of them have been taken, bringing her staff of hairstylists to four.

Still, more growth is on the horizon, Anderson said.

“I’m now about to hire a licensed natural nail manicurist,” Anderson said. “Someone offering natural healthy nail services with Shellac manicures and more. I need a specialist.

“The hair business is very competitive, especially the hair market,” Anderson continued. “Although it had been suggested to me on many occasions and I refused, it was finally a client that convinced me to get into selling hair. I avoided it because everyone was selling hair. I fell in love with Peruvian and went straight for that market. I’m so surprised at how well it’s doing.”

pppHer steadfast willingness to embrace change — particularly when it comes to hair extensions — has benefited her mightily.

All because — you guessed it — she didn’t waste any time.

CCCCC“I was determined to introduce more people to Peruvian (hair) since Brazilian was so dominating,” Anderson said. “Everyone was selling Brazilian, so my exact niche was not to sell Brazilian hair to clients. However, over time and after so many requests, I now keep a small stock of Brazilian for clients who just have to have Brazilian hair. But my number one top seller is Peruvian…the Peruvian Body Wave. It did so well I named it my ‘Signature Strands.’”

aasseeeAll things considered, for a new business owner who’s enjoying instant success, Anderson emphasized that the primary objective must remain the same.

That is, keeping customers happy is her No. 1 priority.

“The most I like about my business is making people look and feel pretty,” Anderson. “I think it’s that feeling of making others happy…just being able to create that feeling for my clients. After a long week and trying times, you can come to 901 Strands and escape and get your life.”

After that long, brutally hectic week, don’t even think of wasting any time.



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Memphis BTW hoops standout Ethan Jones figures to have breakthrough senior season

aaassIt is a foregone conclusion that Leslie Jones wants what’s best for her son, Memphis Booker T. Washington basketball standout Ethan Andrew Jones.

Every so often, in fact, she makes it a point to remind him of such.

In all likelihood, she doesn’t plan to let up anytime soon.

“I need him to get an education because I never got that far,” Leslie Jones told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson on Monday. “And I would be proud to watch him graduate from college.”

As Ethan Jones continues what has been a brutally hectic, but productive summer — particularly on the AAU hoops circuit — his mother yet again is reminding him that she’s undoubtedly his grandest cheerleader.

Fortunately for the 18-year-old rising senior, his mother’s unyielding support couldn’t have come at a better time.

MOM KNOWS BEST --- As Memphis Booker T. Washington basketball standout Ethan Jones continues what has been a brutally hectic, but productive summer --- particularly on the AAU hoops circuit --- his mother, Leslie Jones, yet again is reminding him that she’s undoubtedly his grandest cheerleader.

MOM KNOWS BESTAs Memphis Booker T. Washington basketball standout Ethan Jones continues what has been a brutally hectic, but productive summer — particularly on the AAU hoops circuit — his mother, Leslie Jones, yet again is reminding him that she’s undoubtedly his grandest cheerleader.

For starters, Ethan Jones has yet to generate any official college offers, although while in Orlando, Florida this week for the AAU Nationals, that could all change.

Add to the fact that the 6-foot-6 swingman enjoyed a remarkable junior season in which he helped propel perennial power BTW to the TSSAA Class A state championship game, and it’s no wonder the possibility exists that Ethan Jones could very well garner interests from college scouts and recruiters in the foreseeable future.

“I believe I played the perfect games (all season long) for a big man all around,” said Ethan Jones, assessing his play this past season.

Still, arguably the biggest mystery is whether college scout will at some take notice his overall body of work on the court, most notably his ability to run the floor for a big man, as well as his keen ability to rebound on  both ends of the floor and continue to have an effective presence in the post.

By and large, these are just the key mechanics about which Ethan Jones is determined to upgrade this offseason.

UNDER THE RADAR --- Ethan Jones has yet to generate any official college offers, although while in Orlando, Florida this week for the AAU Nationals, that could all change. Add to the fact that the 6-foot-6 swingman enjoyed a remarkable junior season in which he helped propel perennial power BTW to the TSSAA Class A state championship game, and it’s no wonder the possibility exists that Ethan Jones could very well garner interests from college scouts and recruiters in the foreseeable future.

UNDER THE RADAREthan Jones has yet to generate any official college offers, although while in Orlando, Florida this week for the AAU Nationals, that could all change.
Add to the fact that the 6-foot-6 swingman enjoyed a remarkable junior season in which he helped propel perennial power BTW to the TSSAA Class A state championship game, and it’s no wonder the possibility exists that Ethan Jones could very well garner interests from college scouts and recruiters in the foreseeable future.

After all, he’s months away from the start of his senior prep season, meaning there is no time to let up.

“I am not a regular big man because I can shoot and push the ball down the court,” said Ethan Jones, sounding like the assertive, poised student athlete for which he is widely known. “I work out every day.”

To his credit, it is because of his efficient workouts and conditioning sessions, coupled with his lofty expectations of progressing that he figures to make a solid case that he possess the skills to plat at the collegiate level.

PAW PAW --- Ethan Jones is the grandson of Southern Heritage Classic founder Fred Jones

PAW PAWEthan Jones is the grandson of Southern Heritage Classic founder Fred Jones.

Ethan Jones, who helped BTW to a 25-6 finish this past season, is the grandson of Southern Heritage Classic founder Fred Jones.

“(He’s been playing basketball) since he was about nine years old,” Leslie Jones said. “He played for a summer league. But I wasn’t really surprised because of how tall he was and how he loved to play with his cousins. When I watched him play in the State Championship (last season), it was pure pandemonium. I tend to yell a lot…as much as I love watching them be victorious in close games but, at the same time, it is utterly nerve wrecking.”

As he readies for what figures to be a breakthrough senior campaign for the Antonio Harris-coached Warriors team that is expected to vie for a state crown, Leslie Jones says she’s confident her son will acquire the necessary exposure to lure the attention of college colleges.

“He has always been overlooked and some may have doubted his commitment to the game,” Leslie Jones said. “He is a kid that takes directions well and also takes constructive criticism when he knows it will benefit him in the long run.”

NOT LETTING UP --- To his credit, it is because of his efficient workouts and conditioning sessions, coupled with his lofty expectations of progressing that he figures to make a solid case that he possess the skills to plat at the collegiate level. “(He’s been playing basketball) since he was about nine years old,” Leslie Jones said.

NOT LETTING UPTo his credit, it is because of his efficient workouts and conditioning sessions, coupled with his lofty expectations of progressing that he figures to make a solid case that he possess the skills to plat at the collegiate level.
“(He’s been playing basketball) since he was about nine years old,” Leslie Jones said.

Not to mention, catapult him to his long-awaited dream of dressing out in a college uniform.

“Because basketball is what I like to do,” said Ethan Jones, when asked why is playing college basketball a dream of his. “And I want to play college basketball so I can pursue my dream to make it to the NBA.”

As far as his mother is concerned, amongst the observations about which he instills in her son is to keep his focus on education first and playing professionally a distant second.

“I tell his (team) mates that you can use basketball to advance you to the next level and not necessarily the NBA,” Leslie Jones said. “You have to think long term.”

Every so often, in fact, she makes it a point to remind her beloved son of such.



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

 

Rising entrepreneur Karen Hargrow taking The Krafty Group to a whole new level

KarenA little more than a year ago, Karen Hargrow was birthed with a life-enhancing vision.

Today, unlike never before, she’s destined to witness her well sought after prospect come full circle.

A rising entrepreneur whose reputation is such that she aspires mightily to excel, flourish, and maximize her potential, Hargrow is founder and chief executive officer of The Krafty Group, a newly-established venture designed to strategically develop, organize, and assist businesses and other organizations with a variety of administration and daily operations, most notably management and business set ups, among other entities.

“The mission for the business is (geared toward) efficiency in making your business efficient in servicing clients and customers and increasing your business revenue by handling administration activities,” Hargrow explained during a recent interview with longtime journalist Andre Johnson.

Aside from helping propel businesses to achieve their customer service goals and objectives, The Krafty Group is considered an ideal, yet credible avenue in large part because it is  committed to the proverbial personal assisting, negotiations, management, social media, representation, data entry, QuickBooks entry, and, as Hargrow swiftly acknowledged, “any of your business needs with a can-do attitude of success.”

What’s even more intriguing about The Krafty Group is that Hargrow has adopted a stern commitment for ensuring that any company or organization that strives to concentrate on their business at hand can, in turn, “leave the behind-the-scene tasks to us.
In essence, that is amongst the essential reasons The Krafty Group has greatly evolved as — you guessed it — a business venture that has deemed crafty in various aspects.

katebe“We work with you to push your objectives, goals and dreams of the company and/or organization,” Hargrow said. “No job or project is too small or large. We are prompt with deadlines.  We service small and big corporations, businesses, nonprofits, and companies.”

A native of Chicago, Hargrow currently resides in the Dallas-Fort Worth area by way of Memphis, Tennessee.

Long before relocating to the Lone Star State and starting her business venture, she had befittingly adopted the mindset of one who was destined to delve off in the competitive, notable world of entrepreneurship.

She is a 1994 graduate of Memphis’ Overton Performing Arts High School. Consequently, she enrolled at Hawaii Pacific University after attending Fisk University in Nashville, where she earned her undergraduate degree in 1998.

After years of advancing her education, coupled with business-oriented preparation, The Krafty Group was formed which, according to Hargrow, is the much-aniticipated birthing of a life-enhancing vision she sensed would ultimately come full circle.

How inventive.

How ironic.

How crafty.

“The company would be available to travel for projects as needed and we will (provide) services clients in and out of our company’s offices,” said Hargrow, when asked where she sees her business within the next fiscal year.

For more information about The Krafty Group, call Karen Hargrow at 214-677-3666, or email her at: Kldhargrow@gmail.com.



12308302_1264615573553243_4556209296677596210_nEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, athlete, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Mid-South-area prep basketball standout Quintiyus Causey making noise in Mississippi and Texas

For a 16-year-old rising junior basketball player who boasts lofty aspirations of putting his immense skills on display at the collegiate level, Cleveland (Mississippi) High’s Quintiyus Causey seems to already know how to handle the sometimes tough and challenging media.

Take, for instance, how Causey eloquently responded Monday afternoon when asked what it is he’d like for college scouts and recruiters to know about him.

aaaaTo his credit, he didn’t hold back, nor did he waver or dodge around with his answers.

Rather, he was forthright and to the point.

“(I’m a player) who is laid back, willing to learn, very coachable, able to take constructive criticism, ready to work, and give my all on and off the basketball court,” Causey told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson.

STOCK RISING --- In helping the upstart Cleveland High to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Quintiyus Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial senior campaign.

STOCK RISING — In helping the upstart Cleveland High to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Quintiyus Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial senior campaign.

To get a thorough concept of why Causey appears to harbor a wealth of poise and resolve at such a pivotal stage in his young basketball career, look no further than his stellar effort this past season for Cleveland.

Much to the delight of Cleveland coach James Strong’s Wildcats, Causey was nothing short of remarkable for a team that managed to manufacture the .500 mark by season’s end.

In helping the upstart Wildcats to a 14-14 finish despite a 2-7 showing in Mississippi Region 3-4A play, Causey, a 5-foot-9 swingman, held his own, thus made a solid case that his favorable performance this past season essentially is a sign of things to come in what figures to be a crucial junior campaign.

In emerging as one of the team’s marquee players, Causey appeared in each of Cleveland’s 28 games and averaged 14.1 points, second only to Ellis Townsend II’s 15.1 points per contest.

According to Maxpreps.com, Causey was one of four Cleveland players to see action in all 28 games, a trend that, according to his mother, Colleen Watson, provided her son with an array of confidence in the process.

“When I’m in the stands watching my son play, it brings joy to my heart,” Watson said. “I’m yelling and screaming throughout the games for the team as well as my son. I just continue to thank God daily for continuing his interest for basketball.”

By and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state.

TEXAS SIZE IMPACT --- By and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state. Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters.

TEXAS SIZE IMPACTBy and large, his apparent continuous rise as an efficient basketball player has gone virtually unnoticed, considering Causey has been afforded the luxury of playing at the always competitive AAU ranks in another state.
Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters.

Causey currently is a member of the Fort Worth, Texas-based Beastmode AAU team coached by Adarrial Coleman and, fortunately for him, it seems he’s only increasing his stock with regards to drawing the attention of college scouts and recruiters, considering all this does is win.

So much so that his AAU squad has collected an assortment of championship hardware.

Oh…and let’s not forget Causey’s keen ability to handle the media.

Need more proof?

Just listen to him.

aaassssss“Preparing for my senior year, I know I have to go out with a bang, so I would say (in order to progress) spending countless hours in the gym and in the weight room,” Causey said. “College basketball is very intense. Everything you do is done with a purpose. The things you work on in practice are not just to go through the motion, but you do those things to get something out of it. I’ve always been the type of player that if the game is not taken seriously, I don’t want to play and in college basketball, nothing is for fun and I want to be in an environment where I can play against guys who are said to be some of that nation’s best and let my game introduce me.”

Displaying her signature smile and customary support of Causey, Watson relishes the fact that her son has greatly handled the major high school/AAU basketball maturation processes with ease.

MOM KNOWS BEST ---"The sky is the limit for my son because he's dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Colleen Watson said.

MOM KNOWS BEST“The sky is the limit for my son because he’s dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Colleen Watson said.

She doesn’t expect him to let up anytime soon.

Look out Mississippi and Texas.

Chances are hoops-crazed fans haven’t heard the last of this athletically-talent kid whose best and brightest days are well ahead of him.

“The sky is the limit for my son because he’s dedicated, hardworking, very athletic, a team player and always willing to help and learn new things as it relates to everything, especially basketball,” Watson said.

Credit this basketball mom for always dishing out the biggest assist to an athletically-gifted kid who’s making a strong case that he’s destined to play at the collegiate level.



MrJohnsonEDITOR’S NOTE: If you have a child or team that is seeking exposure and would like an in-depth sports news story, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him for details under “Andre T. Johnson.”

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

The Tony Harris Basketball Academy becoming a West Coast fixture in Los Angeles

TH6Tony Harris earlier this week was asked if he could put a number on how many major Division I colleges extended to him scholarship offers during his playing days at Memphis East High.

“Man…how can I say this without trying to be cocky?” Harris told Sports Journalist Andre Johnson on Wednesday during a telephone interview from Los Angeles. “Just about every major Division I school in the country.”

So what figure did Harris come up with?

“First, I’d have to see how many schools are in each conference,” Harris jokingly said.

By and large, it is because of Harris’ remarkable resume as a product of the hoops-crazed city that is Memphis that essentially prompted a slew of big name college coaches to hasten to his Binghamton residence in hopes of landing the then-Tennessee Mr. Basketball and McDonald’s All-American — from then-Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson to then-Kansas coach Roy Williams.

THAnd so on and so forth.

“When I came out (of East), the top two point guards (in the country) were me and Baron Davis,” Harris said.

Davis ultimately took his talents to UCLA in Los Angeles, the exact same establishment to where Harris and his wife, Alena Kelley-Harris, moved recently.

That is also where Harris has taken his vision of ensuring that his business venture, the Tony Harris Basketball Academy, is a constant success.

An up-and-coming institution that is a little more than two years removed since its inception, the THBA offers a variety of entities to better help young athletes excel and compete at the highest level.

Who better to run such a business than Harris?

Given his outstanding track record as a basketball player, it’s a foregone conclusion that this widely-regarded #BALLIN4CHRIST personality exemplifies the smarts patience that will catapult youngsters to what he describes as the “next level.”

“The purpose is to develop the youth…not just the youth athletes, but for college and professional athletes to enhance their skills set,” Harris said in revealing the mission for THBA. “The game is also mental. There are so many athletes who play the game who are not mentally tough. You can go to camps and academies all day, but are you mentally strong?”

MEMPHIS HOOPS LEGEND --- By and large, it is because of Memphian Tony Harris’ remarkable resume as a product of the hoops-crazed city that is Memphis that essentially prompted a slew of big name college coaches to hasten to his Binghamton residence in hopes of landing the then-Tennessee Mr. Basketball and McDonald’s All-American --- names such as then-Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson to then-Kansas coach Roy Williams. And so on and so forth.

MEMPHIS HOOPS LEGENDBy and large, it is because of Tony Harris’ remarkable resume as a product of the hoops-crazed city that is Memphis that essentially prompted a slew of big name college coaches to hasten to his Binghamton residence in hopes of landing the then-Tennessee Mr. Basketball and McDonald’s All-American — names such as then-Arkansas coach Nolan Richardson to then-Kansas coach Roy Williams.
And so on and so forth.

ENROLL NOW IN THE TONY HARRIS BASKETBALL ACADEMY: https://www.coachup.com/coaches/tonyh-15

Generally, because a number of athletes often struggle with the mental aspects of sports, Harris believes that is where his notable attributes as a licensed minister will come into play.

In a nutshell, THBA isn’t designed solely to teach young athletes the mental aspects of the game but, more than anything, Harris’ objective is to often encourage them to become good spiritual stewards long after the sport has passed them by.

Just as he had done when he organized his academy in Memphis, Harris said plans are currently in the works to conduct classes for his athletes that would be geared largely toward learning the pros and cons on how to handle and interact with the media. In addition, he plans to erect a chapel, where they could become spiritually enhanced much like NBA players meeting with chaplains prior to their games.

A little more than seven years removed having a earned his degree, Harris starred at point guard for East High from 1994-97 before ultimately signing a National Letter of Intent to play at the University of Tennessee.

To his credit, the Vols re-emerged as a national standout, having appeared in the NCAA Tournament in each of Harris’ four seasons, including a Sweet 16 appearance in 2000.

Following his collegiate stint, Harris played professionally overseas for seven years before returning to the states to coach high school ball and eventually starting his academy, which opened for operation a little more than two years ago and was held at STAR Academy Charter School in Northeast Memphis.

Now that he’s on the West Coast, Harris conducts his sessions at the Next Level Sports Complex in Garden Grove, Calif.

HUGE ASSIST --- In moving his academy to L.A., Harris acknowledges much of his success wouldn’t have been possible if not for the unyielding support of his wife who, like him, is a native Memphian. “She’s been very instrumental,” Harris said. “She’s been doing all of the work that you don’t physically see in terms of finding clients. She’s been really innovative in enhancing the process.”

HUGE ASSISTIn moving his academy to L.A., Harris acknowledges much of his success wouldn’t have been possible if not for the unyielding support of his wife who, like him, is a native Memphian.
“She’s been very instrumental,” Harris said. “She’s been doing all of the work that you don’t physically see in terms of finding clients. She’s been really innovative in enhancing the process.”

MORE ABOUT TONY HARRIS: https://www.coachup.com/curry

Hours of operations are typically from 3 p.m.-9 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and Harris said that will change during the summer months.

As usual, THBA offers a variety of entities, most notably teaching youths various fundamentals and mechanics as they prepare for competitive play.

“How my drills are set up, they’re game-like situation drills,” Harris said. “You’ve got a lot of trainers who use cones for skill work. You know, that’s okay and all. But you’ve got to put the athlete in a game-like setting. That’s what separates me from other trainers. It enhances the player IQ. But if you’ve got them drilling through cones, that’s not going to help them.”

In moving his academy to L.A., Harris acknowledges much of his success wouldn’t have been possible if not for the unyielding support of his wife who, like him, is a native Memphian.

“She’s been very instrumental,” Harris said. “She’s been doing all of the work that you don’t physically see in terms of finding clients. She’s been really innovative in enhancing the process.”

Not to mention grasping a feel for how much the athletes progress days or, perhaps, weeks upon enrolling in THBA.

“He takes phone calls from kids’ parents and reach out to college coaches in an attempt to help the kids build a rapport with them,” Alena said. “He’s putting them in front of the recruiters.”

As a result, the results have undoubtedly been favorable, which is to be expected from a former local basketball star, who admittedly still has his boatloads of scholarship letters tucked away back in Memphis.

Nowadays, his primary ambition, his wife said, is to help others’ dream come true.

TH2Notable past clients include former Memphians Nick King, Cory Bradford, and Alex Anderson, all of whom went on play major college basketball.

“When (parents) bring them to the academy, we’re thinking long terms,” Alena said. “The goal in mind is to enhance their fundamentals and turn them into five-star players.”

Much like her husband was nearly two decades ago.



AndreEDITOR’S NOTE: If you are an athlete, entrepreneur, business owner, producer, author, musician, barber, life coach, motivational speaker, cosmetologist, tax preparer, model, or pastor/minister who is seeking exposure and would like to share your story with an in-depth news feature, call Reporter Andre Johnson at 901-690-6587 or Facebook message him under “Andre T. Johnson” for details.

Andre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. A 2000 graduate of the University of Memphis School of Journalism, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division from Dallas, Texas. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.

Stephen Curry isn’t focused on MVP, wants champs to eclipse Bulls’ 72-win mark

SIZZLIN' STEPH ---  In a year in which Curry, the league’s leading scorer at 30.3 points per game, has been nothing short of remarkable in having engineered Golden State to the best start in NBA history when the Warriors reeled off 24 consecutive wins to begin the season, it would be hard-pressed to find anyone capable of surpassing him as the conjectural favorite for MVP. (Brandon Wade/AP Photos)

SIZZLIN’ STEPHIn a year in which Curry, the league’s leading scorer at 30.3 points per game, has been nothing short of remarkable in having engineered Golden State to the best start in NBA history when the Warriors reeled off 24 consecutive wins to begin the season, it would be hard-pressed to find anyone capable of surpassing him as the conjectural favorite for MVP. (Brandon Wade/AP Photos)

DALLAS — Last year, Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry seized the NBA’s Most Valuable Player award in rather impressive fashion, having garnered 100 of the 130 first-place votes while compiling 1,198 total points from a nationwide panel of sportswriters and broadcasters.

This year, with the three-time All-Star being dubbed the presumptive front-runner to capture the NBA’s most covenant individual award in consecutive seasons, Curry quickly acknowledged that isn’t his primary focus.

“I’m not worried about that,” Curry, a seven-year veteran, told MemphiSport following Friday’s shoot around session in Dallas’ American Airlines Center. “There’ll come a time where that decision will happen. I go out every night playing as if I want to help my team get wins and do my part of being consistent and efficient as I can be. And that’s my focus.”

In a year in which Curry, the league’s scoring leader at 30.3 points per game, has been nothing short of remarkable in having engineered Golden State to the best start in NBA history when the Warriors reeled off 24 consecutive wins to begin the season, it would be hard-pressed to find anyone who’s capable of surpassing him as the conjectural MVP favorite.

Besides being the league’s top scorer, Curry is second in free throw percentage and third in three-point field goal efficiency, having made 45.7 percent of his shots from long range.

Add to the fact that the high-powered Warriors, who improved to an NBA’s best 63-7 with Monday night’s win at Minnesota — the team that’s responsible for ending their 24-game undefeated streak to start the season — and are on pace to eclipse the Chicago Bulls’ 72-10 record they amassed during their 1995-96 championship season, and it’s no wonder Curry in all likelihood will continue to field questions as to whether he thinks he’s well on his way to walking away with more MVP hardware.

“Obviously, team success leads to accolades and that’s our mission right now,” said Curry who, last year, led Golden State to its first world championship in 30 years when the Warriors upended the Cleveland Cavaliers in six games of their NBA Finals best-of-7 series.

STAYING FOCUSED --- When asked if failing to surpass the Bulls’ historic 72-win plateau serve as motivation heading into the postseason, Curry, who turned 28 March 14, paused briefly then said, “I would hope we have that same motivation either way. Winning a championship is the ultimate goal, and a regular season regular record, whether we have 73 wins, 69 wins, or 68, it doesn’t bear any difference on how we’re going to do in the playoffs.”

STAYING FOCUSEDWhen asked if failing to surpass the Bulls’ historic 72-win plateau serve as motivation heading into the postseason, Curry, who turned 28 March 14, paused briefly then said, “I would hope we have that same motivation either way. Winning a championship is the ultimate goal, and a regular season regular record, whether we have 73 wins, 69 wins, or 68, it doesn’t bear any difference on how we’re going to do in the playoffs.”

As far as this year’s league MVP talks go, Warriors coach Steve Kerr on Friday was quick to say that there is Curry, and then there is everyone else, although he doesn’t believe the former Davidson College star will be the unanimous favorite to win the award.

“I’d be shocked if he doesn’t win it with the kind of season he’s had and we’ve had,” said Kerr, when asked if Curry is the front-runner. “But there are always several great candidates. But it’ll be tough imagining Steph not winning it.”

A little more than a week removed from having clinched the Pacific Division and their fourth consecutive postseason berth, Curry reiterated that individual awards are the least of the Warriors’ concerns, considering they undoubtedly are everyone’s biggest game and have yet to clinch home court advantage throughout the postseason for a second consecutive year.

Golden State leads second-place San Antonio (59-11) by four games in the West with 12 regular season games remaining.

When asked if failing to surpass the Bulls’ historic 72-win plateau serve as motivation heading into the postseason, Curry, who turned 28 March 14, paused briefly then said, “I would hope we have that same motivation either way. Winning a championship is the ultimate goal, and a regular season record, whether we have 73 wins, 69 wins, or 68, it doesn’t bear any difference on how we’re going to do in the playoffs.”

Then without hesitation, Curry offered this notable suggestion:

JUST BEING BLUNT --- As far as this year’s league MVP talks go, Warriors coach Steve Kerr on Friday was quick to say that there is Curry and then everyone else, although he doesn’t believe the former Davidson College star will be the unanimous favorite to win the award. “I’d be shocked if he doesn’t win it with the kind of season he’s had and we’ve had,” said Kerr, when asked if Curry is the frontrunner. “But there are always several great candidates. But it’ll be tough imagining Steph not winning it.”

JUST BEING BLUNTAs far as this year’s league MVP talks go, Warriors coach Steve Kerr on Friday was quick to say that there is Curry and then everyone else, although he doesn’t believe the former Davidson College star will be the unanimous favorite to win the award.
“I’d be shocked if he doesn’t win it with the kind of season he’s had and we’ve had,” said Kerr, when asked if Curry is the frontrunner. “But there are always several great candidates. But it’ll be tough imagining Steph not winning it.”

“But I know we don’t want to be the team that gets the record and doesn’t win (a championship),” Curry said. “That’s what the Bulls did. They finished the job, obviously. Whatever our record is, that’s great. But playoff success is a totally different animal. Your record is zero and zero once you get into that first round.”

When asked, “Deep down inside, do you want to get this record?” Curry paused again then said, “There’s a reason you’re still talking about the 95-96 Bulls team, so yes, that would be a huge accomplishment. I’ve always said we want to do it with the big picture in mind. I think we can accomplish both if we stay true to who we are and not get distracted by playing for the record as opposed to playing for the bigger goal.”

Spoken like a player in postseason form.



 

AndreAndre Johnson is a senior writer for MemphiSport. Based in Dallas, Texas, Johnson covers the NBA Southwest Division. To reach Johnson, send an email to memphisgraduate@yahoo.com. Also, follow him on Twitter @AJ_Journalist.